Dream. Flourish. Succeed.

English 5 * Critical Thinking

Fall 2018 * Instructor: Cdub

Assignments & Announcements

English 5 Critical Thinking class, Laney College, fall 2018 — instructor: Chris Weidenbach

ENGL 5 – CRITICAL THINKING FALL 2018 SYLLABUS


Thursday, Dec. 13: Final Class Meeting: 10am-Noon

All previous work will be graded and ready to return to you — FINALLY

In lieu of a final exam, students are asked to write a 1- to 2-page response to the following questions:

In light of all lectures, discussions, and texts you have considered in this class this semester, what connections can you draw between the different components? — And what have you learned, or learned more about, which you feel can be applied in your personal life and/or academic pursuits?

— Texts have included the SPJ Code and articles students submitted, excerpt from Where to Invade Next?, the Lewis Powell memo, Think-Tanks, TRIBE, the Poor People’s Campaign and Sustainability & Social Justice-related articles.

— You might want to mention what has been the most relevant, meaningful aspects of this course.

You can email the instructor your response, or bring it in print to our final class meeting on the 13th.

cweidenbach@peralta.edu

Please note: There is NO class meeting on Tuesday the 11th.


Monday, December 10th is INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS DAY!

Here is a simplified version of the International Declaration of Human Rights:

https://www.civicsandcitizenship.edu.au/verve/_resources/FQ2_Simplified_Version_Dec.pdf

Here is a fuller version:

https://www.jus.uio.no/lm/en/pdf/un.universal.declaration.of.human.rights.1948.portrait.letter.pdf

For Thursday, Dec. 6:

Please post responses to as many of the S&SJ questions as you find compelling on the Padlet!


Tuesday, Dec. 4:

Hello English 5!
PLEASE POST A SURVEY QUESTION ABOUT PROMOTING SOCIAL JUSTICE AND SUSTAINABILITY AT THIS PADLET LINK: https://padlet.com/cweidenbach/vkd6j78np36a

— Be sure to include your name, so I know whose question is whose!

— Or you can email me with your question.

Your question could possibly be about the connections between the two concepts. –At the end of your question, please provide a framework for answering, like the two example questions:

Example Q1: Do you think most people in the East Bay would appreciate guidance on what sustainability means? (Yes or No — and, if you wish, what kind of guidance.)

Example Q2: How much do YOU care about Social Justice / Human Rights? (0-10, with 10 being “I care A TON!”–and feel free to comment.)


Thursday, Nov. 29th:

Tuesday’s assignment is still on the table.

Please also bring to class in writing — or email to the instructor prior to class — THREE SUGGESTIONS of events or activities that you think would be interesting, educational &/or fun elements of the Sustainability & Social Justice push either down the stretch of this semester, or in the Spring — or both…

–OR– If you find this whole thing to be a fool’s errand,  not worth engaging in, or a ‘spitting in the wind’ endeavor, you can provide three well-reasoned explanations why.

–Please trust that this is a genuine assignment option, as I think it might challenge the willing participants to consider some relevant, important aspects that they otherwise might not consider! –Cdub


For Tuesday, Nov. 27th: 

Please READ (or REVIEW) the three articles posted for Nov. 20th — as well as the “Points of Inquiry” document below, listing the selected points-of-inquiry on the Sustainability & Social Justice integrative learning assignment —

then WRITE a one-page-max response in which you either raise new questions, or discuss one or two of the questions on the list: Basically, I want to know what you think about the proposal to promote knowledge and action based on the concepts of Sustainability & Social Justice.

What, if anything, do you think people should consider DOING?

What do you need to know more about in order to decide whether and how to take part in this push? 

Sustainability and Social Justice Points of Inquiry-highlighted questions

For your convenience, here is the S&SJ Call for Collaboration:

Call for Collaboration – SUSTAINABILITY and SOCIAL JUSTICE – 2018-19


Thursday, Nov. 22: Thanksgiving Holiday — no class meetings at Laney / Peralta.


For Tuesday, Nov. 20th: — Class meeting cancelled due to dangerous air quality.

Please read the following three commentary articles, considering whether you detect political bias, ‘missing facts’, unsupported claims, or any logical flaws or fallacies:

Want to Save the Climate? Break Up the Big Banks – https://goo.gl/duJg4o

The New Poor People’s Campaign: Seeds of a Non-Party Opposition? – https://goo.gl/D9Y1cn

People Like Me – https://goo.gl/QypC9k


For Thursday, Nov. 15th:

Please read at least THREE of the following articles, and come to class with a BRIEF written statement expressing why ONE of them should be read by the entire class:

Want to Save the Climate? Break Up the Big Banks – https://goo.gl/duJg4o

The New Poor People’s Campaign: Seeds of a Non-Party Opposition? – https://goo.gl/D9Y1cn

People Like Me – https://goo.gl/QypC9k

Urging House Democrats to Go Bold on Climate, Group Says Probing Fossil Fuel Giants Must Be a ‘Top Priority’ – https://goo.gl/SSeupj

Backed by Ocasio-Cortez, Youth Climate Activists Arrested in Pelosi’s Office Demanding Democrats Embrace ‘Green New Deal’ – https://goo.gl/7SFq2j

7 Economic Terms That Are Often Used to Trick People Out of Their Money – https://goo.gl/KGc6W1

We Have Movement Work To Do – https://goo.gl/kz9dYt


For Tuesday, Nov. 13th:

The TRIBE essay is due, with a list of Work(s) Cited.

PLEASE ALSO SUBMIT THE YELLOW DRAFT REVIEW PAGES FROM THURSDAY!

“Work Cited” is the heading if TRIBE is the only text you cite; “Works Cited” is appropriate if you cite more than one text.

The list should appear directly after your last paragraph, and should look like this:

Works Cited

Junger, Sebastian. TRIBE: On Homecoming and Belonging. Hatchett Book Group, New York, NY. 2016. Print.

Moore, Michael. Where to Invade Next? Sony Pictures Classic. 2016. Documentary film.

[Other texts would be listed, by author, etc., in alphabetical order by LAST NAMES.]


For Thursday, Nov. 8th:

TRIBE essay drafts due — please bring THREE copies– okay to print on both sides.

(The essay prompt is posted near the top of this page: https://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/english-264/english-201ab-documents-links/ )

Please read the following advice on Argument and Thesis Statements:

Three-Part-Thesis-Statements — This is a very brief document written by the instructor. It should open in Word.

http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/argument/

http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/–Be advised that the examples on the UNC’s page are not the same kind of issue-oriented statements we will be building. Still, their page is meaningful for understanding how important and useful thesis statements are.


Tuesday, Nov. 6th:

Connecting the dots — and working on essay drafts: Thesis statements and “Quoteburger” — In They Say / I Say, they call it “quotation sandwich.” Check out Chapter 3 of the online text if you’re curious! It starts on p. 70 of the .pdf .


For Thursday, Nov. 1st: Please read this: Poor Peoples Campaign_FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES

In class, we will get back to the Sustainability & Social Justice points of inquiry, and

the prompt for a short essay on TRIBE will be distributed.


Tuesday, Oct. 30:

Class will meet in The Student Center, 3rd floor — If possible, come early, and stay late for the…

Teach-In: Pipeline to Housing Security: Building Unity for the Power We Need!

9:30am-1:30pm

***HW: Please read through the end of Chapter 3 of TRIBE.

***HW: Then write a one-page, 1.5-spaced response to the following prompt:

Do you see ways that PEOPLE IN TODAY’S SOCIETY could be happier, or healthier, or more empowered by making some changes – big or small – that would fit with the ways of life Junger describes as more “tribal”?


For Thursday, Oct. 25: NO CLASS MEETINGS IN PERALTA COLLEGES!!! — It’s our Professional Development Day.

— If you want to lighten your reading load for the weekend, Cdub suggests reading and ANNOTATING through the first ‘half’ of TRIBE Chapter 3: In Bitter Safety I Awake–  up to the break on page 91.


For Tuesday, Oct. 23:

Evaluate a “Think-Tank”: Remember that Lewis Powell’s strategy to fight back against the “Attack on the Free Enterprise System” involved investment in organizations to write and speak in the interest of promoting pro-business perspectives. That strategy resulted in the growth of a new ‘industry’: Think tanks.

Now, lots of ‘think tanks’ and institutes exist, some of them with fairly pure, straightforward intentions to do real research and propose real solutions to to real problems — and some of them aiming to drive whatever political agendas they support, not always in an honest way.

Here’s a brief, helpful overview of Think Tanks from a very well respected British magazine, The Economist:  https://www.economist.com/the-economist-explains/2017/01/05/what-do-think-tanks-do

1-Choose one by Googling “think tank list” — or pick one from this list: https://thebestschools.org/features/most-influential-think-tanks/

2-Describe its ‘Ethos’/Mission/Purpose by quoting from its website (most have an “About Us” statement).

3-Also describe it in your own words: This organization/institute seems to be focused on… 

4-Describe or explain its BIAS — and indicate whether its level of bias is, in your view, problematic.

(5-Discuss where you would place it according to the Political Spectrum, if possible!)

6-Evaluate it for relevance, credibility, and overall value or worth in a self-governing society.


 

Extra-Credit opportunity for Monday, Oct. 22 — Noon-2pm — Laney Forum

OK to come for first or second half, too. Click here for details!


For Thursday, Oct. 18:

Please read through the end of Chapter 2 of TRIBE.

— If you haven’t yet taken one of the online Implicit Bias Tests, please do! (See Oct. 16th assignment.)

— And if you already submitted the Project Implicit homework, feel free to do another test, and write another response for extra credit.


For Tuesday, Oct. 16th:

1–Please read the first half(ish) of Chapter 2 of TRIBE, pp. 35-55.

2–Please take one of the bias tests on the Poject Implicit website:  https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/selectatest.html

“This study should take about 10 minutes to complete. At the end, you will receive your IAT result along with information about what it means.”

2.5–After taking the text, write up a brief response, including which test you took, and what you think about the result.

3–If you haven’t done the  Sept. 11th homework, PLEASE DO IT! –-The responses submitted so far have been incredibly good!!! (Please scroll down to Sept. 11th.)

–FYI: Google search for “Think Tanks” — We might continue with this in future weeks. Check some out if you’re interested!

https://www.google.com/search?q=Think+tanks&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-1


For Thursday, Oct. 11:

Catch-up day. Review of the Powell Memo, and possibly moving on with TRIBE, Chapter 2.

Tuesday, Oct. 9:

Please read through the end of Chapter 1 of TRIBE, and…

Also please read this overview of ‘argumentive fallacies’ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/fallacies/

A quiz on Chapter one will begin our class.


Thursday, Oct. 4:

Powell and TRIBE — Please bring the book to class! (Sorry for the late posting. -CW)

Two letters published this week about the Brett Kavanaugh nomination:

https://images.law.com/contrib/content/uploads/documents/415/Lettr-re-Kavanaugh.pdf

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/10/03/opinion/kavanaugh-law-professors-letter.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage&mtrref=feedly.com&assetType=opinion


Tuesday, Oct. 2:

1–Please obtain, and bring to class, a print copy of the book TRIBE!

2–To join this class on Remind.com:

Please text @e34f8a to the number 81010

You’ll receive a welcome text from Remind.
If anyone has trouble with 81010, they can try texting @e34f8a to (512) 379-5481.
You can also join by going to remind.com/join/e34f8a

For Thursday, Sept. 27th:

#1: Cdub will finish HIS homework, and return all essays!!!

#2: Please finish reading & annotating the Powell memo, with the following questions in mind:

  • What problem(s) is Powell identifying?
  • What is Powell suggesting and arguing for?
  • Do you see evidence — TODAY — of Powell’s strategy being successfully implemented?

http://reclaimdemocracy.org/powell_memo_lewis/

You can either write out short answers to the questions, or make notes on a print copy, or in your notebook. The point is to think about Powell’s ideas with these questions in mind, and read extremely well!


For Tuesday, Sept. 25:

Please see Sept. 20 for the assignment, but feel free to use this easier-to-read link:

http://reclaimdemocracy.org/powell_memo_lewis/


For Thursday, Sept. 20:

Please read this brief intro, and then the memo it describes, linked just below.

As you read, ANNOTATE the text by highlighting or underlining key ideas, and writing notes in the margins, or — if you’re reading on a screen — listing some of the key ideas from each section in a notebook.

On August 23, 1971, less than two months before he was nominated to serve as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Lewis F. Powell, Jr. mailed a confidential memorandum to his friend Eugene B. Sydnor, Jr., Chair of the Education Committee of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.  The memo was titled  Attack On American Free Enterprise System and outlined ways in which business should defend and counter attack against a “broad attack” from “disquieting voices.” 

Here is both a typscript and printed version.

Source: Washing & Lee School of Law: http://law2.wlu.edu/powellarchives/page.asp?pageid=1251


Tuesday, Sept. 18:

Information Media & Me essays is due

— Perfection is over-rated — but ‘ALMOST perfect’ is super-stylish!

— If you can, please include a list of Works Cited at the end of your essay — on the same page, if there’s room. (Example below!)Please Note: We don’t want the whole web address/URL; just include the basic website name, through the domain (.org, .com, .info, etc.)

— In Part 4, be sure to really think about what, if anything, has changed in the way you think about info-media after the several weeks we’ve been looking at it, thinking about it, sampling it, discussing it and now writing about it. SOMETHING must be different than where you started on August 20th — What has changed? And why? Where are you at now?

Works Cited

Lastname, Firstname. Title of article. Website.org. Month Day, Year. Accessed September 6, 2018. Video/Audio/Print.

Society of Professional Journalists. Code of Ethics. Spj.org. September 6, 2014. Accessed August 23, 2018. Print.


For Thursday, Sept. 13:

A typed draft of the Information Media & Me essay is due. A couple of new links have been added under Aug. 30 below. And remember, you can also refer to some of the programs at KPFA.org, Dave Zirin’s “Edge of Sports”, and “Your Call” with Rose Aguilar — all linked on this page under “Information Media Links”.


For Tuesday, Sept. 11:

Please read these two documents:

Defining Critical Thinking – fall 2018

Call for Collaboration – SUSTAINABILITY and SOCIAL JUSTICE – 2018-19

— Then write out five (or so) questions that you think are appropriate points of inquiry about the Sustainability & Social Justice ‘project’.”Inquiry” is simply the process of asking good questions, and looking for answers and related knowledge. You might want to consider the following ways of thinking:

Are there any terms that need to be defined?

Are there key facts that would be important to know?

Do you detect any problematic bias in the organizations listed or in their definitions of “sustainability”?


For Thursday, Sept. 6:

 — Please catch up with any assignments you have not completed. They are listed below under their due dates.

— Please check out these two sites regarding BIAS:

https://www.adl.org/education/resources/tools-and-strategies/lets-talk-politics-bias-dialogue-and-critical-thinking

http://researchguides.njit.edu/evaluate/CRAAP

In class, we will review this upcoming formal essay assignment. Print copies will be distributed in class. Feel free to preview it!

Essay-One-Information-Media-and-Me


For Tuesday, Sept. 4:

Please read this opinion piece, which has a clear bias, but also some compelling reasoning, and make note of places where you notice:

1) Convincing reasons for agreeing with the author (highlight in yellow, or single-underline)

2) Words, phrases, or whole sentences that seem ‘unfair’ or biased toward a particular perspective (highlight in pink, or double-underline)

You might need to make a print copy of the article. I suggest selecting just the text of the article, and using “print selection” from the advanced printer options. https://act.credoaction.com/sign/warren_corporate_accountability

Here is a version in Word, edited to remove the opening paragraph plea for activism: Op-Ed on Senator Warren corporate accountability bill

— For some fun reading about BIAS, check out the CRAAP test from CSU Chico!  http://www.csuchico.edu/lins/handouts/eval_websites.pdf

Here is a more readable online version: http://researchguides.njit.edu/evaluate/CRAAP


Assignment for Thursday August 30th — OK to submit Sept. 4th!

Please check out at least THREE of the articles or websites posted below — submitted by members of our class — and write a very brief response for each, simply stating whether or not you find the article or info-outlet worthy of your time and attention. –This is the kind of EVALUATION we’ll be doing with a lot of the texts we consider this semester.

NEW LINKS:

https://theskimm.com/recent

from Cristian: The Skimm: “Making it easier for you to live smarter”

 

 


https://www.aljazeera.com/news/

https://www.npr.org/2017/10/07/556320354/van-jones-on-the-messy-truth

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/10/the-ethics-of-autonomous-cars/280360/

https://www.nytimes.com

My name is Olivia Ekholm and here is my nominee for a journalistic site according to the SPJ code:

And…. below is an article I don´t consider ethically journalistic according to the SPJ code:

https://www.watchdog.org/

Hi I’m Mario Talavera here’s the link

https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/27/us/jacksonville-madden-tournament-shooting/index.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/27/us/jacksonville-shooting-gaming-esports.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fus&action=click&contentCollection=us&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=sectionfront – Joshua Tanguma

The history and future of Confederate monuments  – Alejandro

It’s Cristian Valle from your 10:30 AM class.

For the homework assignment, I’m kind of trying to bring it a step more challenging for myself. I was looking for a local journalistic source and I came across this            (  “Ethical” Journalistic Site  ).

from Shuyi Sun:  https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/21/americas/venezuela-earthquake/index.html

Here is a link that I think complies Spj with the code of ethics.
 – Echow Saelee
Hi professor C-Dub, I hereby attached a link of website https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-45331781

Links to reading assignments, audio & video texts, and other webbable information will be posted here, along with clear, succinct assignment prompts. Assignments will always be mentioned in class, but they will always be posted here, too.

Feel free to check out some of the links in the right-hand column.

There is ONE low-priced book you will need to obtain by October 2nd — and it is NOT YET in the bookstor, but will be:

TRIBE: On Homecoming & Belonging. —You’ll need a print copy — not an ebook or digital copy — because you’ll be annotating it right in your copy of the book, or on Post-It notes.

We will watch this short interview with Junger in class. You can preview it if you like:

 

For Tuesday, August 28:

Please read the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics:

https://www.spj.org/pdf/spj-code-of-ethics.pdf

— and email the instructor with a ‘nominee’ for a journalistic site or example of reporting or commentary that you consider ethically journalistic according to the SPJ Code.

JUST EMAIL ME A LINK! (You should be able to copy a website URL, and paste it into the email message.

PLEASE type “English 5” or “Critical Thinking” in the email subject line — and be sure your name is included somewhere in the message!

Here is another online copy that has expandable explanations of some points in the Code:

https://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp


Below this line is information from a previous semester.


WEDNESDAY, DEC. 16th: 

The Final formal essay is due.

Please note: The instructor will be at the classroom from 8:45-10:00am. –I apologize to any early birds who arrive before 8:45am. My spouse needed to respond to a workplace emergency, and I had to deliver my son to school at 8:30. –CW

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For Wednesday, Dec. 9 or Wed. Dec. 16th: Submit the Final Formal Essay

For Wednesday, Dec. 9: 2nd chance on the Points of Inquiry homework assignment posted for Monday the 7th. (See below.)

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For Monday, Dec. 7: IMPORTANT!!!

Please read The Leap Manifesto, and find at least THREE points of inquiry in it. –You can either write out questions on a separate page, or use annotation on a print copy to highlight language you have questions about, and write your questions in the margins.

Points of Inquiry may be:

  • definitions of key terms
  • explanations of historical references or current controversies
  • examples of factual claims–or COUNTER-examples that DIS-prove what the authors are saying.

——————-Reminder: An event tightly related to the Leap Manifesto:

Friday, Dec. 4th, 7pm: Film Screening: This Changes Everything: the Film.

Despite the gravity of a world in the grip of endless cycles of consumption, Klein offers hope: “The realization that a solution is possible, well, that changes everything.”

$10 suggested donation. No one turned away for lack of funds. –Meet C-Dub there by 6:45 if you’d like to get a free ticket!

WHEN: December 04, 2015 at 7pm – 9pm

WHERE: First Unitarian Church of Oakland
685 14th St, downtown Oakland
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Wednesday, Dec. 2:

Please read the articles on page two of the last two issues of the Laney Tower newspaper, choose the one you like best, and write an annotation entry (with a clear Citation, a brief, accurate Summary, and an Evaluation paragraph) for that article.

Please note: The final essay prompt is under revision, due to our short time remaining this semester. The new, applicable prompt will be posted by the time our class meets on Wednesday, Dec. 2nd.

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Nov. 25th: Essay Two is due.

Monday, Nov. 23rd: Essay Two draft due–Please bring THREE PRINT COPIES. Please see the page for Formal Essay Two.

Some great links are on this page: http://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/english-1a/information-hub/

____________________

Wednesday, Nov. 18th: Citations and Works Cited lists; Continue with info-media outlets, recommendations & evaluations

Monday, Nov. 16th: Writing evaluative annotation entries; Continue with info-media outlets, recommendations & evaluations

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Wed, Nov. 11th: Veterans Day HOLIDAY–No class meetings.

Please see http://iava.org/

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For Monday, Nov. 9:

Read, watch, and/or listen to at least two texts from the following information-media outlets, and…

Write annotation entries (Citation, Summary, Evaluation) for both:

1. Your Call (radio show) — You can select any of the programs with a LISTEN button. The host’s name is Rose Aguilar. http://www.yourcallradio.org/

2. This is Tuesday’s broadcast of DemocracyNow!–the second-most-watched/listened-to daily news program in the U.S. You can watch the video broadcast, or listen to the radio-ready broadcast. http://www.democracynow.org/shows/2015/11/3

3. One deep piece of writing from one of America’s leading new voices: The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration, by Ta-Nehisi Coates: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/10/the-black-family-in-the-age-of-mass-incarceration/403246/#Chapter%20VIII

The author, Ta-Nehisi Coates, has gained a large following very quickly over the past year or so. Here is his home page at The Atlantic monthly magazine: http://www.theatlantic.com/author/ta-nehisi-coates/

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For Monday, Nov. 2:

  1. Please read and annotate the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics–a short but detailed list. Here is a link to a good, one-page, printable .pdf copy:  http://www.spj.org/pdf/spj-code-of-ethics.pdf
  2. AND–Check out some information media outlets, or think about outlets you already pay some attention to, and put them to the SPJ test: Is your outlet following the SPJ Code?
  • Please keep in mind that the SPJ Code has guidelines for commentary as well as reporting. Commentary is opinion-based. We need to distinguish commentary from reporting, but the Code applies to both areas.
  • Some possibilities are at this page: http://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/media-links

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For WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29:

Print out and read this article, and HAND-WRITE an essay based on the questions at the end of the article. The instructor suggests writing roughly one paragraph per question, plus maybe adding an introductory paragraph.

Time to Abolish Columbus Day By Bill Bigelow

_________________________________

For Monday, Oct. 26th:

Homework: If you hit the quiz, and nailed it, GOOD WORK! –You can earn an extra HW credit by showing the instructor an annotated print copy of the second half of Zinn’s Ch. 1.

If you missed the part-one quiz, you can earn that credit by showing the instructor an annotated print copy of the chapter.

In class, we will pick up where we left off, drafting and ‘defending’ thesis-level ideas in response to Howard Zinn’s Chapter One. –If you didn’t get your thesis on the board during our last class, please come prepared to say (in writing) something meaningful and zesty!

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Wednesday, Oct. 21st:

  • READ: Please read the remainder of Zinn, Ch. 1.
    • WRITE: Draft a thesis-level statement in response to this chapter. One great sentence. Don’t summarize; SPEAK!!!

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For Monday, Oct. 19th:

  • Writing assignment: A print copy of the first formal essay is due!
  • Reading assignment: We will start class with a quiz on this reading:  Chapter One of Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History of the United States”. Please read up to where Zinn writes, “The reader may as well know that before going on,” a little more than halfway through the chapter. [This reading may take a good hour or more, but it is GRIPPING. Give it a chance, superhero!]
  • If you want a print copy of Zinn, and are using a computer lab on campus, please do not print the entire chapter from the website. You can print the half that you need by highlighting the text up to the halfway point, and using “print selection” in the print menu; or you could copy that text and paste it in Word for easy manipulation.
  • The book is also on reserve at the College Library’s Textbooks desk, and available at most new & used bookstores.]

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For Monday, Oct. 12th — OR — Wednesday, Oct. 14th:

Due one of these two days: A draft (typed, print copy) of the First Formal Essay. (Please hit the link to see the full prompt.)

If you need to print it at the Writing Center (B-260), they open at 9am, so please get there at 9, and bring your copy to the classroom a.s.a.p.!

Show me/us something! We’re going to read/listen to what you have to say with open minds and a supportive, critical interest in your perspective.

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For Wednesday, Oct. 7th:

Please be sure to complete the Mon Oct. 5th assignment (see below). 

For an extra homework credit, write up an annotation entry for the film HEIST, directed by Donald Goldmacher.

Monday, Oct. 5th:

This assignment is worth two homework credits:

Please print out the linked article by an anonymous writer, read and annotate it, and write an annotation paragraph for it:

http://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/openforum/article/Planned-Parenthood-saved-my-life-6538371.php?t=d3fe88a03dcefdcb88&cmpid=twitter-premium

For the annotation entry, please include these three components:

  • name the text (Citation)
  • briefly summarize it (General Description), and
  • evaluate it (Critical Comment): Is the article interesting? –Why? Does the author seem reliable? Is this a ‘fresh take’ on the subject? Is the subject relevant to you and the people in your life? Does what she says make sense–is her argument persuasive? Does she make you think differently or more deeply about the subject?

Feel free to keep these three parts separate. If you want, you can even label them “Citation”, “Summary” and “Evaluation”. Pretty soon, this form will become second nature to our class.

*Please note: This is not really a They Say / I Say moment; but the links under Sept. 28 might be very helpful, especially this one.

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Wednesday, Sept. 30th:

One more chance to submit (late) annotation entries. (See Sept. 28th for guidance and details.)

We will push through the documentary film HEIST in class.

–All previous homework will be returned.

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Monday, Sept. 28th: Two Annotation Entries

What is an annotation entry? Read these explanatory pages:

http://www.scu.edu/library/research/general/upload/writingannot.pdf

http://library.csusm.edu/subject_guides/research_guides/annotations.pdf

Then write two annotation entries: (1) for one of Dave Zirin’s columns, and (2) one other piece of commentary or reporting you find on your own about Pope Francis’ visit to the USA. Here is Zirin’s site: http://www.edgeofsports.com/archive.html

–And here is a great news/journalism site: http://www.democracynow.org/

–Feel free to put both annotation entries on the same page, but leave a little space between them.

–Don’t worry about the citations being perfect, but do be sure to name the authors, titles, dates, and places the articles are published (just the basic website through .com or .org or .net).

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For Monday, Sept. 21st: Read & Annotate

Please read (or re-read) Dave Zirin’s article Today’s Sports News Would Boggle the Mind of a 1965 Sportswriter, and ANNOTATE IT–using highlighters, underlining, notes/questions in the margins or any other ways of marking and interacting with the text.

***Here are some good ways to annotate a text!***

A print copy was distributed in class on the 16th. If you use the link above, please make a print copy and bring it to class on the 21st.

–It would also be helpful for you to read Chapter One of They Say / I Say. –If you make a print copy of this .pdf, you can annotate it, too!

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For Wednesday, Sept. 16th:

If you completed the assignment for Monday the 14th, feel free to earn an extra homework credit by writing another response (limit ONE).

If you didn’t complete the assignment for Monday the 14th, please do so for Wednesday’s class.

For Monday, Sept. 14th: Read, read, read, read, read & WRITE!

1. Please read the Introduction of They Say / I Say. It’s a fairly quick read, but it’s important.

2. Also please read Angela Scott’s column on page two of the Laney Tower newspaper.

3. And please read these three articles from Dave Zirin’s The Edge of Sports:

http://www.edgeofsports.com/2015-08-21-1061/index.html

http://www.edgeofsports.com/2015-08-17-1060/index.html

http://www.edgeofsports.com/2015-08-06-1057/index.html

4. THEN, please use one (or more) of the sentence templates in the TS/IS intro as part of a one-paragraph response to one of the three columns (Scott or Zirin). –This can be informal, but if you want to type it up, go ahead!

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Wednesday, Sept. 9:

Please read the Introduction of They Say / I Say. It’s a fairly quick read, but it’s important.

*And please come on-time, since we will be doing some reading and writing right away!

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Sat-Sun-Mon, LABOR DAY WEEKEND: PLEASE TRY TO SEE THIS SHOW!:

FREEDOMLAND! by the S.F. Mime Troupe

Seeing this show will not be required, but it is HIGHLY recommended–especially the closing performances over Labor Day weekend in Dolores Park in S.F.

http://www.sfmt.org/schedule/index.php

Peacock Meadow in Golden Gate Park

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Friday, Sept. 4th: GO EAGLES FOOTBALL!

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For Wednesday, Sept. 2:

No new reading or writing assignments. If you need to complete the task for Monday, please DO! (Typed or handwritten is fine.)

In class we will read and annotate a juicy piece of writing.

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Monday, August 31st:

Please spend a little time shaping the paragraph you started in class on the 26th. –If you weren’t in class on that day, some prompts will be posted soon, and you can write a paragraph based on one of them.

Feel free to come hungry. CW is serving a “Panhandler”: Papas, huevos, scalions, hongos & queso. BYOB!

Prompts: What are you good at? What do you know a lot about? What are you fairly naturally interested in? What preoccupies your thoughts when you don’t have any ‘must-do’s’ demanding your mind’s attention? –Write about one of these areas!

–If you missed class last Wednesday, then you can submit this paragraph on Wednesday the 2nd — but what the #$%& are you missing class for?!?!?!?!?

See you all soon! –CW

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Below this line is information from previous semesters.

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CW’s office hours during Finals Week:

Monday thru Thursday, 11am-Noon.

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* * *  There is no final exam for English 1A. * * *

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Wednesday, May 20th: 9-11am class: Please drop by to pick up graded work and for a course grade estimate.

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Monday, May 18th: Noon-2pm class: Please drop by to pick up graded work and for a course grade estimate.

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* Friday, May 15th is a holiday — the birthday of Malcolm X. The campus will be closed.

If students still have work to submit, they are asked to do so via email, or in-person on Monday, May 18th. Papers can be slid under the door of office T-550. 

I apologize for this late notice about the Friday holiday. –CW

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Due Wednesday, May 13th:

Essay #3: Sustainability Term Paper 

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For Monday, May 11th:

Students are encouraged to bring at least one print copy of a Term Paper essay draft to class for peer review and feedback from the instructor.

–If you can swing it, please bring two or even three print copies, which will facilitate the peer review process.

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*** For anyone concerned about Baltimore and the Black Lives Matter movement, the Tuesday, April 28th edition of Hard Knock Radio sheds much light in the form of reporting/interview/commentary:

https://kpfa.org/episode/hard-knock-radio-april-28-2015-4/ — Just click the blue “Listen” button, and if you want to skip the headlines, scroll to the 8:15 mark.

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Monday, May 4th/Wednesday, May 6th:

Due this week: An annotated bibliography (Ann. Bib. or A.B.) for the Term Paper. –If you have it completed on the 4th, then your work is done for this week. If it’s partially completed, you’ll need to finalize it and bring it on the 6th. If you’re planning to submit it on the 6th, you can come on Monday the 4th to look at some examples and ask questions about building your A.B.

This page from the UNC Writing Center has a full explanation of Annotated Bibliographies:  http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/annotated-bibliographies/

From that page:

“Evaluative annotations don’t just summarize. In addition to tackling the points addressed in summary annotations, evaluative annotations:

  • evaluate the source or author critically (biases, lack of evidence, objective, etc.).
  • show how the work may or may not be useful for a particular field of study or audience.
  • explain how researching this material assisted your own project.”

Here’s the Term Paper prompt page: http://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/english-1a/instructions-for-formal-essay-3-term-paper/

For Wednesday, April 29th:

Today’s goal: By the end of class, students should have a strong thesis statement and a plan/outline for building a successful Term Paper.

* If you have one or both of these already, please bring them to class, and you should have a shorter day of class!

Term Paper prompt

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For Monday, April 27:

1. Re-issued: Please bring a “trial thesis statement” to class on Monday. Consider this a “work-in-progress” that may be revised as you work out the details of your Term Paper. Don’t hold back! Be BOLD!

2. Want some quick feedback on your thesis statement? Email it to the instructor at cweidenbach@peralta.edu — Please paste the language right into your email message, rather than sending an attachment.

3? Why wait? Do some research using the Library Guide Phillippa Caldeira built for our class:

ENGL 1A Library Guide (Weidenbach) – Last Updated Apr 9, 2015

Click on Picture to eMail a librarian for help!

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For Wednesday, April 22:

Please read the following advice on Argument and Thesis Statements:

Three-Part-Thesis-Statements — This is a very brief document written by the instructor. He will bring print copies of this, as well as some argument templates, to class on Wednesday. It should open in Word.

http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/argument/

http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/–Be advised that the examples on the UNC’s page are not the same kind of issue-oriented statements we will be building. Still, their page is meaningful for understanding how important and useful thesis statements are.

Please bring a “trial thesis statement” to class on Wednesday. Consider this a “work-in-progress” that may be revised as you work out the details of your Term Paper. Don’t hold back! Be BOLD!

A GREAT example of a Term Paper, with its Thesis Statement and Annotated Bibliography, is now posted at the bottom of the Essay #3 Term Paper webpage.

If you’re looking for ideas about subjects you could write about, check out the East Bay Express’ Sustainability articles from their current edition: http://www.eastbayexpress.com/oakland/sustainable-living/Category?oid=3892592

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For Monday April 20: Please be sure you have read the Term Paper prompt (in its current state) and some of the sustainability definition links before class.

Please CHOOSE ONE of the sustainability definition links, and write an ANNOTATION ENTRY for it — consisting of ye olde citation, summary, and evaluation.

Also please prepare for class by writing down some potential subject areas for your Term Paper. We will be sharing these ideas with in-class partners, working to develop the ideas and recommend information sources for each other.

* Essay Two grading is nearly complete, and the essays are generally strong! Feel free to check your essay’s status on Turnitin.com. All essays will be graded by Monday the 20th, and we will look at some big successes together.

Food for the soul: Here is the link for Cornel West’s speech that we watched in class: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwBbdR3okcA&feature=youtu.be

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For Wednesday, April 15th: No new assignment. We will begin class with group ‘huddles’ brainstorming about ideas for the final formal essay, the Term Paper.

***Tuesday, April 14:

Extra-Credit Opportunity: Observe and Report on a rally at 14th & Broadway in Oakland:

http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2015/04/05/18770798.php

A Call from the Stop Mass Incarceration Network:
STOP BUSINESS AS USUAL!
SAY NO MORE! TO THE SYSTEM GIVING A GREEN LIGHT TO KILLER COPS!

Here is Dr. Cornel West’s speech calling for the April 14th action — Dr. West speaks after Carl Dix, at about the 35:00 mark: http://revcom.us/movement-for-revolution/stop-mass-incarceration/april-6-emergency-call-to-act-cornel-west-carl-dix.html

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For Monday, April 13: Extension/continuation of the April 6 assignment:

Students are asked to read/watch/listen to–and annotate–three of the following texts. All pertain to our focus on sustainability in a self-governing society.

***Please annotate all three by writing notes about what meaningful content they offer, as well as some of your response ideas. 

Text #1: Please choose one of the following: Read the short essay Curing Corrupt Capitalism by economist Richard Wolff published on the Moyers & Company website: http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/04/curing-corrupt-capitalism/

–or watch/listen to Bill Moyers’ 2013 30-minute interview with Richard Wolff: http://www.democracyatwork.info/articles/2013/03/full-segment-democracy-at-work-on-moyers/

–or listen to this January interview with Richard Wolff on Sonali Kolhatkar’s KPFA show Uprising. The interview begins at the 28:00 mark; you might have to wait a couple minutes for the audio to load up to that point, and click/scroll on the time bar to where it starts:

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=111192

Texts #2 and #3: Listen to both halves of the March 27th Project Censored Show from KPFA:

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=9945

(First 30 min.) “Today… host Mickey Huff welcomes Prof. Nolan Higdon to the program to discuss his recent five part series, Justice for Sale. The series looks at private for profit prisons, recidivism, poor treatment of prisoners, and what we can do about these issues–

(Last 30 min.) And former Black Panther, Charlotte O‘Neal (a.k.a. ‘Mama C’) recently gave an address for Social Justice Week at Sonoma State University in Northern CA. Highlights from her talk, “Empowering Students in Social Justice” will be shared.”

–descriptions are from the show’s Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/ProjectCensored/posts/10153348625384994

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For Wednesday, April 8:

9am class: We will meet in the Library, room L-104, for a research and database orientation.

Noon class: We will meet as usual in B-257, and work with the human rights and sustainability texts assigned for Monday the 6th to generate ideas for the final formal essay, the Term Paper.

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* * * For MONDAY, APRIL 6th: Please note: Instead of our regular class meeting, students are asked to spend the class time reading/watching/listening to–and annotating–the following texts. All pertain to our focus on sustainability in a self-governing society.

***Please annotate all three by writing notes about what meaningful content they offer, as well as some of your response ideas. 

Text #1: Please choose one of the following: Read the short essay Curing Corrupt Capitalism by economist Richard Wolff published on the Moyers & Company website: http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/04/curing-corrupt-capitalism/

–or watch/listen to Bill Moyers’ 2013 30-minute interview with Richard Wolff: http://www.democracyatwork.info/articles/2013/03/full-segment-democracy-at-work-on-moyers/

Texts #2 and #3: Listen to both halves of the March 27th Project Censored Show from KPFA:

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=9945

(First 30 min.) “Today… host Mickey Huff welcomes Prof. Nolan Higdon to the program to discuss his recent five part series, Justice for Sale. The series looks at private for profit prisons, recidivism, poor treatment of prisoners, and what we can do about these issues–

(Last 30 min.) And former Black Panther, Charlotte O‘Neal (a.k.a. ‘Mama C’) recently gave an address for Social Justice Week at Sonoma State University in Northern CA. Highlights from her talk, “Empowering Students in Social Justice” will be shared.”

–descriptions are from the show’s Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/ProjectCensored/posts/10153348625384994

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***The week of March 30-April 3 is Spring Break. No class meetings.***

PLEASE NOTE: The ‘deadline’ for Essay #2 has been extended: The essay is due via Turnitin Sunday, March 29th before midnight. –If you have any trouble logging into Turnitin, please email your essay to the instructor before the deadline, with your essay text pasted right into the message box.

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Peralta’s Spring Break runs through the week of March 30-April 5. –There is no reading or writing assigned during the break. Rest, relax, and recreate!

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For Wednesday, March 25th:

BOTH CLASSES: If you didn’t show CW a draft on Monday, please bring three print copies to class on the 25th. The drafts are due by 9:30am / 12:30pm, to give students time to print at B-260 or F-170.

If you DID have a draft in class on Monday for peer review, then your attendance is completely optional.

The essay will be due via Turnitin.com this coming Friday at midnight.

For Monday, March 23rd:

Due at the beginning of class: THREE COPIES of a typed draft of Essay #2: Info-Media Outlet Recommendation. Please see the prompt on this page: http://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/english-1a/formal-essay-2-media-outlet-rx/

The Tavis Smiley show is an outlet. KRON 4 news is an outlet. The mission for the essay is to recommend an outlet that seems particularly valuable, useful, professional (according to SPJ standards), and hopefully BETTER than the usual, snooze-ual news outlets that don’t really push for the kind of truth a self-governing society needs.

We often say, “Knowledge is power.” What’s an outlet that you believe can truly EMPOWER people?

Select your outlet, describe it, critique it, and give at least one full example of the kind of content it offers. –These are the 1, 2, 3 & 4 on the Essay 2 prompt. Please see the full prompt for the full explanation of this assignment.

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For Wednesday, March 18th: Please come to class with a list of two or three info-media outlets that you are considering writing about for the second formal essay. In class: Film: The Healthcare Movie; homework credits status reports.

For Monday, March 16th: Here are links to some useful outlets and journalists you can find in the “Reliable Websites and News Sources” tab of the Library Research Guide Laney Librarian Phillippa Caldeira built for our class. (Thank you, Phillippa!) Please look for TWO texts (written articles, video segments, or radio/audio segments) * featuring or focused on women * that you find meaningful, and write annotation entries for each:

  • Al Jazeera English
    Al Jazeera English focuses on people, and the events that impact their lives. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect.
  • Colorlines: News for Action
    Colorlines is a daily news site where race matters, featuring award-winning investigative reporting and news analysis. Colorlines is produced by a multiracial team of writers who cover stories from the perspective of community, rather than through the lens of power brokers.
  • NPR (National Public Radio)
    NPR is a mission-driven, multimedia news organization and radio program producer. It is a network with a strong base of Member Stations and supporters nationwide. NPR is also the leading membership and representation organization for public radio.
  • Washington Week with Gwen Ifill
    Gwen Ifill is moderator and managing editor of “Washington Week” and co-anchor and managing editor of the “PBS NewsHour.” She is the best-selling author of “The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama”. Gwen reports on a wide range of issues from foreign affairs to U.S. politics and policies interviewing national and international newsmakers.

–BONUS LINK: Here is NPR’s ethics handbook: http://ethics.npr.org/

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Wed., March 11: (Please check the post for your specific class.)

Noon-2pm class: We will meet as usual in B-257. Your assignment is to read/watch/listen to your choice of two more texts featuring women journalists, and write an annotation entry for each. –You can choose segments from DemocracyNow! or Your Call if you wish. Or check out the links ABOVE and find an interesting texts at the Gwen Ifill site and/or women-focused texts at the ColorLines, NPR or Al Jazeera sites.)

9am class: Attendance on this day is optional. There is no assignment. However, if you did not check in with the instructor on Monday the 9th, please come to the classroom between 9 and 10:30am for about 15 minutes to check on your course status and the status of the first formal essay (the Turnitin essay). –Monte, David, Solomon, ‘Tasia, Tyler, Darrion, Toni, Michael, Chris G., and Brennan, please come by for a quick conference. I have some successful assignments to return to you. (The earlier, the better.) Anyone else is also welcome to check in.

*If you have missed any assignments and would like to submit them, this is the day to do so.

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Monday, March 9: Noon-2pm class only: We will meet in Rm. L-104 on the first floor (downstairs) of the Laney Library!

For Monday, March 9th: Please watch or listen to TWO segments from the following outlets hosted by two highly recommended women reporters and commentators, and WRITE annotation entries (w/ citations, summaries and evaluations) for each. Feel free to hit the samples linked below, or to go to the outlets’ websites and search for segments that look interesting to you. (The two below seem very relevant to me–especially Michelle Alexander on Democracy Now! –CW)

Amy Goodman, producer/host of Democracy Now! (http://www.democracynow.org/)

Michelle Alexander on the Wednesday, March 4th program:

http://www.democracynow.org/2015/3/4/michelle_alexander_ferguson_shows_why_criminal

http://www.democracynow.org/2015/3/4/michelle_alexander_roots_of_todays_crisis

Rose Aguilar, host of KALW’s Your Call (http://yourcallradio.org/)

Wed. Feb. 25 program: http://kalw.org/post/your-call-improving-police-and-community-relations-poverty-real-issue

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For Wed. March 4:

This will be a very important ‘synchronization’ day of class. There is no homework assignment. Students, please check your own familiarity with the following Information Media Terms and Concepts, which we will be using heavily: media, outlet(s), content, selection, emphasis, bias, reporting, commentary, journalism, “the Fourth Estate”, SPJ, social media.

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For Mon. March 2:

1. Read and annotate–on a print copy, or on a separate page–the following article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/rethinking-local-incarceration/2015/02/24/2f98a3c4-bb97-11e4-bdfa-b8e8f594e6ee_story.html

2. Choose TWO MORE TEXTS from the Information Hub page, and write annotation entries for each.

Here is an example of an annotation entry written by Fall 2014 student Jarrett Wright:

Moyers, Bill. Full Show: Too Big to Jail? Moyers & Company. 10/03/2014. Video.

This was an interview with William K. Black (Bill Black), a White Collar Criminologist, who is visibly frustrated with the lack of accountability that senior banking executives have been held to. Black, goes on in great detail over the mutual hand washing that goes on between politicians, senior banking executives, and even junior executives, exposing the fraud they’ve been allowed to commit with essentially Zero Liability.

The sustained outrage that we have all felt for such flagrant disregard for the law, and the double standard of accountability to which they have been held has become such that I am becoming numb to the pain of watching such interviews. I’ve reached the limits of my emotional output knowing that for committing crimes nowhere near as severe, I absolutely will be punished to the full extent of the law and with full prejudice. Whereas bankers who willfully bankrupt the entire planet – they get nothing more than a tax deductible fine.

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For Feb. 25: Check out some of the Recommended Black Journalists links on the Information Hub page. Read/watch/listen to your choice of texts, spending about an hour taking in the texts, and decide which one you think is most interesting. Then write an annotation entry consisting of a Citation, a brief Summary, and a short paragraph Evaluation of the text you choose, each separated by a blank line. (Typed or handwritten is fine.) 

Citation: Who, what, where & when: Name the text, using whatever title, author, speaker or program host’s name is appropriate. Include the date of publication or broadcast, if it’s knowable. And include the basic website, such as pbs.org, or msnbc.com — but NOT the full web address.

Summary: Try to describe the text in one sentence, or maybe two. Feel free to quote from the websites’ own descriptions, but be sure to use quotation marks and mention that the language comes from their sites.

Evaluation: Is the text useful? How so? What VALUE does it offer? Does it give you more understanding? Does it challenge your existing stance on a controversial issue? Does it raise interesting questions? Do the voices involved establish a high degree of credibility? Is it ‘watchable’/enjoyable/inspiring? Is it tedious and monotonous? –If you wish: Does the text show the journalist following the SPJ Code of Ethics? How so, or how not?

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For Feb 23:   Due: Read and annotate the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics–a short but detailed list. Here is a link to a good, one-page printable .pdf copy:  http://www.spj.org/pdf/spj-code-of-ethics.pdf

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***** Saturday, Feb. 21: Due via Turnitin.com at 11:59pm: Revision of Essay #1

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For Wednesday, Feb. 18: 

DUE: A typed draft of Essay 1: 

IMPORTANT: Please bring ONE PRINT COPY to class, as well as submitting your essay electronically on the Turnitin website: http://turnitin.com/

Write an essay in which you discuss 1) an important part of your identity or expertise and 2) your relationship to one or more of the texts our class has read/discussed/viewed so far.

You are welcome to also refer to other texts, but if you do so, be sure to describe them in such a way that any good reader would understand what you’re talking about.

Potential thesis template:

I find (Author)’s (Title) especially meaningful as it relates to my interest in / knowledge of / identity as a/an ________________________.

Please note: This webpage has extra information and suggestions for Essay 1, plus the instructions for using Turnitin.com: http://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/english-1a/instructions-for-essay-1/

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Monday, Feb. 16th is one of the Presidents Day holidays — No class meetings.

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For Monday, Feb. 9:

1. Please read and annotate the Lewis Powell memo: http://law2.wlu.edu/deptimages/Powell%20Archives/PowellMemorandumPrinted.pdf

Remember: In this memo, Powell expresses a pro-big-business perspective, outlining a strategy for corporations to hold onto–and regain–political and legal power.

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For Wednesday, Feb. 4:

1. Following up on King & Zinn: Please read and annotate We Dare Not Postpone Action by CCT. Also please read the Introduction of They Say / I Say.

2. This is a ‘catch up’ day for King and Zinn assignments. Please make sure you read these texts and earn these two homework credits!

*

For Monday, Feb. 2:

Please read & annotate (w/highlighting, underlining, margin notes, etc — or notes in a separate notebook — Ch. 2 of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States.(<<– that’s the link!)

The college library has copies at the Textbooks desk, and you can make photocopies of the pages you need.

— Remember: If you want to print this chapter out at B-260 or F-170, you can only do ten pages at a time. Use “Print Selection”, or copy the text into a Word document so you can control the page count. Nine pages worked for Leslie in the Noon class to print a copy off the web! –The instructor apologizes: He does not have permission to post a Word document copy of the chapter.

*

For Wed, Jan. 28: Please read & annotate (w/highlighting, underlining, margin notes, etc) Dr. Martin Luther King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail.

Bonus Link: Audio recording of King himself reading his Letter… –Recommendation: Listen to King while you read! The audio is in the box BELOW the picture of King. It might not work on all computers/devices. Sorry about that.–CW

http://www.latinorebels.com/2013/01/15/audio-recording-of-letter-from-birmingham-jail-by-dr-martin-luther-king-jr/

Here is a calendar of class readings and assignments:

English 1A Calendar-Jan-March

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(Below is info from fall 2014)

Announcements

Extended office hours during Finals week:

CW will be in his office (T-550) Monday 10-11:30am, Tuesday 10-11:30am & 12:45-2:45pm, and Wednesday 10am-2pm.

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Assignments

9am class: Wednesday, Dec. 10th is our last day. If you have not yet submitted your Term Paper, then it is due at 9:30am. The instructor will be in the classroom from 8am-10am. After 10am, he will be in his office, Tower #550. (The Noon-2pm class will not meet this day.)

Noon class: Monday, Dec. 8th is our last day. If you have not yet submitted your Term Paper, then it is due at 12:30pm. (The morning class will not meet this day.)

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  • Quality journalistic radio: Davey D, John L. Burris and others on the Ferguson, MO grand jury decision, and subsequent protests: KPFA’s Up Front, Tues. Nov. 25: http://www.kpfa.org/archive/id/108832

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For Wednesday, Dec. 3:

 

Documents page.

Please be ready for a peer review of drafts at 9:30 / 12:30.

HERE is an example of a former student’s Ann. Bib., followed by her essay: http://laney.edu/english/about/for-students/

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For Wednesday, Nov. 26

Due: THREE COPIES of a typed Annotated Bibliography draft—including texts you’ve decided to use thus far, and a “working thesis” for your Term Paper. This gives you a chance to let others know what you’re striving to say, prior to writing the actual argument; and your audience can ask questions and offer reactions and suggestions. Peer review of drafts will begin at 9:30/12:30.

HERE is an example of a former student’s Ann. Bib., followed by her essay: http://laney.edu/english/about/for-students/

“Evaluative annotations don’t just summarize. In addition to tackling the points addressed in summary annotations, evaluative annotations [can]:

  • evaluate the source or author critically (biases, lack of evidence, objective, etc.).
  • show how the work may or may not be useful for a particular field of study or audience.
  • explain how researching this material assisted your own project.”

–from http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/annotated-bibliographies/

An exemplary Ann. Bib. (and the essay the student wrote) is on the English Department website: http://laney.edu/english/about/for-students/

*Revisions of Information Media Rx essays are also due.

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For Monday, Nov. 24:

DUE: Essay Response — typed, ONE COPY:

Response to A More Perfect Union by Barack Obama

Please read A More Perfect Union by then-Senator Barack Obama, and follow the directions on the document to write an essay in response to the questions at the end of the essay.

–You may have to save the document temporarily, and then open it from where you saved it.

–As you read, look for places where Obama makes the moves described in They Say/I Say . You will need to decide what ideas Obama is responding to, what his main idea is, and how he builds the argument he is making.

–Suggestion: Write about one paragraph in response to each question. The first three questions are all about Obama’s argument, although your judgment about how well he argues his points is involved; your own opinions on the subject(s) are especially called for in the final question, so when you get there, have your say!

(A printable prompt is at the top of the Documents & Links page.)

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For Wednesday, Nov. 19:

Please read the following opinion piece about Martin Luther King, and write short answers to the questions below the link:

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/08/29/1011562/-Most-of-you-have-no-idea-what-Martin-Luther-King-actually-did

1. What ideas is the author responding to?

2. What is Hamden Rice’s thesis / main idea?

3. How does Rice support the main idea with evidence and reasoning? –and/or how does Rice fail to adequately support the main idea?

4. Do you find Rice’s argument to be convincing? Why, or why not?

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For Monday, Nov. 17:

UN Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials.

Please consider what problems or challenges people are facing today, and where you might look for ideas and information that would help develop your thinking and support your proposed solution(s).

You will be responsible for building

1) an Annotated Bibliography,

2) a well-crafted thesis statement, and

3) an argumentative essay developing that thesis.

More details will be provided the week of Nov. 17th.

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For Monday, Nov. 10 and Wednesday, Nov. 12:

In-class: Review of Zinn’s Ch. 1; Term Paper introduced; and group discussions of these two texts:

1–Read and annotate: Please read this short version of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (this page shows Articles 1-15; for Articles 16-30, hit the “next” button, or use this link: UDHR-articles 16-30)

–AND–Please annotate the UDHR in terms of which rights/Articles make perfect sense to you (use a check-mark), which ones are unclear (use a question mark), and/or which ones–if any–seem unreasonable or unworkable (use a minus sign). You could copy the articles into a Word document, and annotate that way, or make lists of sensible, unclear and unreasonable Articles on a separate page or document.) –This is NOT an “annotation entry” assignment.

2–Read and Respond: Please read this opinion piece (http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/09/18/1330536/-Can-Moral-Monday-Save-America-Pay-Attention-Teabaggers-This-Is-What-Patriotism-Looks-Like#) by Leslie Salzillo from Daily Kos, as well as looking through the photos and reading some of the comments other readers have posted. –Try ten or fifteen comments, and then if you want to read more, go ahead.

–Then write a half-page or so in response, explaining what the article’s author is doing well, and what, if anything, she is not doing well. –Nudge: In the instructor’s opinion, the author is making at least one bad move!

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For Wednesday, Nov. 5: Please be sure you have read the first half of the first chapter of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States — up to where Zinn writes, “The reader may as well know that before going on,” a little more than halfway through the chapter.

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For Monday, Nov. 3:

1. A print copy of the Information Media Recommendation essay is due. –It can be submitted Wed. Nov. 5th.

2. Please read the first half of the first chapter of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States — up to where Zinn writes, “The reader may as well know that before going on,” a little more than halfway through the chapter. [This reading may take a good hour or more. If you want a print copy, and are using a computer lab on campus, please do not print the entire chapter from the website. You can print the half that you need by highlighting the text up to the halfway point, and using “print selection” in the print menu; or you could copy that text and paste it in Word for easy manipulation. The book is also on reserve at the College Library’s Textbooks desk, and available at most new & used bookstores.]

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For Wednesday, Oct. 29:

The number of students with print copies of drafts on Monday was HORRIBLY LOW. Those who were on it: Good job.

-> If you want to submit your essay after having it reviewed on Wednesday, please bring the draft copy and your revised copy in print on Wednesday. You may have a short day of class.

-> If you want feedback on your draft, please bring a print copy on Wednesday–and arrive by 9:30/12:30 for a round of critique. –If you arrive after 9:30/12:30, you will have to wait in the quad for a second round.

-> If you don’t yet have a draft, you are missing out on valuable course-grade points; but if you need help understanding or approaching the assignment, please come to class AFTER 10:15am/1:15pm on Wednesday.

–EVERYONE: If you’ve missed some of the previous readings, they are all still posted below.

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For Monday, Oct. 27: DUE: A typed draft of the Formal Essay–Information-Media Rx. The assignment prompt is at the top of the Documents & Links page. (It was distributed in class on spearmint paper.)

You may want to consult this citation tutorial from the UNC: http://www2.lib.unc.edu/instruct/citations/index.html?section=introduction

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For Wednesday, Oct. 22nd: Please read the What’s News? explanations below, and consider how these ideas relate to each other, and to the SPJ Code of Ethics.

The Nature of News from VCU’s Beginning Reporting journalism class: http://www.courses.vcu.edu/ENG-jeh/BeginningReporting/Prewriting/natureofnews.htm

What is News? from The News Manual http://www.thenewsmanual.net/Manuals%20Volume%201/volume1_01.htm

What’s News and Who’s a Newsmaker? from the Real News Network http://therealnews.com/t2/about-us/mission

About Democracy Now! http://www.democracynow.org/about

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For Monday, Oct. 20th:

Annotation Entry due: Due to the website malfunction, there is no new assignment for Monday; but if you have not yet written annotation entry to recommend an information-media outlet, please do so for Monday. The instructor’s example is below under Oct. 15th.

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For Wednesday, Oct. 15th:

Please write an annotation entry — or a regular paragraph — for the sake of nominating an information-media outlet for our class’ webpage. *This should NOT be a particular text/video/article; it should be an information-media outlet, such as The Sacramento Bee, Jorge Ramos’ America, Anderson Cooper 360, or Democracy Now!

For example:

Cit: Edge of Sports: The Weekly Sports Column by Dave Zirin. edgeofsports.com

Sum: Dave Zirin, the sports editor for The Nation magazine, has been writing about the intersection of sports, society and politics for several years now. His commentary column usually focuses on a current controversy in the sports world, often connected to historical events. He approaches subjects from his viewpoint as a politically progressive, deeply knowledgable, and rabid sports fan.

Eval: Zirin knows the world of college and pro sports very deeply, and pulls no punches in his ethically based commentary.  He mocks unethical behavior by the “business class” of the sportsworld, especially team owners and league executives, and his tone makes his columns fun to read even when he occasionally overplays his ethical cards. He applies his standards to athletes, coaches, referees and fans alike, and I have learned a lot more from his provocative articles than I would have learned by watching and reading more traditional sports reporting.

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For Monday, Oct. 13:

* Please read this short article from Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting: http://fair.org/press-release/public-tv-where-the-one-percent-rule/

* Please watch & listen to the following two TV journalism segments, and write an annotation entry for each of them. Feel free to put them both on one page, or one document.

In your evaluation, please consider how well the segments meet the SPJ code of ethics, as well as other qualities you want to consider, such as educational, entertaining, unique, accessible, logical, ethical, emotional, etc:

1. Bill Moyers’ show Moyers and Company, featuring William K. Black, an economist who has been very outspoken about corruption in American banking and politics: http://billmoyers.com/episode/full-show-big-jail/ (about 45 minutes)

2. Here is a link to the FusionTV program Jorge Ramos’ America, and their segment on a fake political campaign: http://fusion.net/video/19426/meet-gil-fulbright-the-most-honest-politician-in-the-country/ (about 10 minutes)

FYI: And here’s a link to Represent.US, the organization sponsoring the fake campaign: https://represent.us/

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* * * EXTRA-CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: Wednesday, Oct. 8

 

For Wednesday, Oct. 8:

1–If you haven’t completed the assignment for Monday, please do.

2–Is there a network, a website, a TV or radio program, a particular reporter or commentator, a documentary film, a newspaper or magazine you would recommend as a credible source of information? Please consider nominating a particular journalism outlet for our class’ website. Nominations will be taken in class on Wednesday.

CW’s nominations:

1. Bill Moyers’ show Moyers and Company. This is the most recent show, featuring William K. Black, an economist who has been very outspoken about corruption in American banking and politics: http://billmoyers.com/episode/full-show-big-jail/

2. Here is a link to the FusionTV program Jorge Ramos’ America, and their segment on a fake political campaign: http://fusion.net/video/19426/meet-gil-fulbright-the-most-honest-politician-in-the-country/

And here’s a link to Represent.US, the organization sponsoring the fake campaign: https://represent.us/

For Monday, Oct.6:

1–Read and annotate the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics–it will take about 10-15 minutes. Here is a link to a good printable .pdf copy: http://www.spj.org/pdf/ethicscode.pdf

2–Check out the “KPFA Program Grid” and look for non-music program titles* that sound interesting to you. Pick one out, click on the title, and give it a listen, either on-air live at 94.1 fm, or online via recorded audio. (Most programs are one hour long. Click on the link that says “Listen to past programs”. Keep in mind that many programs have a brief intro, followed by KPFA News Headlines during the first 5-7 minutes. If you want to skip the headlines, you can slide the cursor forward.)

* The instructor recommends Hard Knock Radio and Democracy Now!(on KPFA) / democracynow.org

3–Write a brief annotation entry citing the program, then summarizing it, then evaluating it in one-paragraph (roughly half a page), focusing on this question: Does the program follow the SPJ Code of Ethics?

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For Wednesday, Oct. 1st:

No new assignment. Please be sure you have written the two pieces assigned for last week, the 22nd and 24th.

In class, we will work with the two homework assignments, and finish screening Inside Job.

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Monday, Sept. 29th: Class meeting is cancelled due to instructor illness.

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Wednesday, Sept. 24th, 6pm, D-200: film screening and discussion:

Harvest of Empire: The Untold Story of Latinos in America. Extra-credit available if you attend for the duration of the event.

For Wednesday, Sept. 24:

Find one article (reporting or commentary) that relates to Matt Taibbi’s The Divide, and that you would like to nominate for our class’ reading list. Cite it, and write a brief summary and evaluation explaining why you think it’s worth our time and attention.

For Monday, Sept. 22:

Read the introduction to The Divide by Matt Taibbi*, and annotate it with margin notes, highlighting, underlining, etcetera. Write a brief (2-3 sentences) summary of it, followed by a short evaluation paragraph explaining how it might be useful, or why others might want to read it, or whether it makes you curious about reading the rest of Taibbi’s book.

Please cite the text at the top of your page. Here is the citation:

Taibbi, Matt. The Divide. Spiegal & Grau. New York. 2014. Print.

*copies distributed in class Wed. Sept. 17. Extra copies available in an envelope outside Tower 504.

For Wednesday, Sept. 17th: 

9am class: Please review and annotate (with margin notes, highlighting, underlining, etc.) your partner’s argument outline from Monday. –If you did not exchange outlines with someone, please be sure to come to class with your argument outline in good shape.

Noon class: Please bring to class your full argument outline in good shape.

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For Monday, Sept. 15th: Please read the ARGUMENT ‘handout’/page from UNC: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/argument/

–This is one of our textbooks. It mentions some other pages on the UNC site, including one on thesis statements and one on evidence. Click ’em and read ’em if you think they might be helpful.

Then, build an outline of an argument regarding policing using this template: 5-paragraph_argument_architecture  –This is a Word document. You might have to “save” it before “opening” it.

You are encouraged to find ways of using the articles we’ve read if you think they can help you make your case; if you do so, please be sure to name the authors and titles. We won’t worry about proper citation format for now, since this is an outline, and not a full formal essay.

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For Wednesday, Sept. 10th: No new assignment. One more opportunity to submit the reading/writing assignment posted for Sept. 8 (see below). Please be sure you have read the previously assigned readings, including the Introduction and Chapter 1 of They Say/I Say. –All links are posted below.

In class, we will be moving fast to review the last three readings (Sept. 3 and 8), as well as the template concepts in They Say/I Say and the logos-ethos-pathos rhetorical analysis/opportunity framework.

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DUE: Monday, Sept. 8th:

Please read and annotate Chapter One of They Say / I Say. If you make a print copy, you can annotate by highlighting, underlining, etc. –Then use one (or more) of the templates to build a strong paragraph in response to the following reading:

http://billmoyers.com/2014/08/13/not-just-ferguson-11-eye-opening-facts-about-americas-militarized-police-forces/

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EXTRA-CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: Attend, then write a 1/2 – 1-page review of the event experience. Students are encouraged to BEAR WITNESS, to observe and report. Any other participation should be chosen with careful discretion and an emphasis on personal safety. *Attend with a friend, and help each other be safe and smart!

Friday, Sept. 5, 4pm-6pm

Protest “Urban Shield” and the militarization of Police departments

Marriott Hotel
Broadway & 12th Street
Oakland,CA 94612

Urban Shield is the SWAT team training and weapons expo that brings together local, regional and global police-military units. It will be held in Oakland September 4-8. And its host? The Marriott Hotel.
Here is a good explanatory press release from one of the sponsoring organizations: http://facingteargas.org/p/127/press-release-wake-ferguson-bay-area-groups-call-end-police-militarization

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Due Wednesday, Sept. 3:

Please read and annotate the following two articles regarding recent events in Ferguson, MO — and a legacy problem around the USA:

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/08/18/1315081/-A-Cops-take-on-Ferguson?detail=email

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/08/18/1322315/-A-Former-Prosecutor-s-Random-Thoughts-on-Ferguson?detail=email

A reading quiz is likely. We will be looking into “Rhetorical Analysis” with an eye on ETHICS as we analyze and evaluate these texts.

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Monday, Sept. 1 is LABOR DAY–No class meetings at Laney/Peralta.

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DUE: Wednesday, August 27th:

Please read and annotate the introduction to They Say / I Say. If you make a print copy, you can annotate by highlighting, underlining, etc. Writing questions or comments in the margins is a great way to “talk to the text”. You might be able to do some of this type of annotation using the “Comments” feature on the .pdf file.

DUE: Monday, August 25th:

This is a second opportunity to complete the assignment for Wed. Aug. 20:

Wednesday, August 20th:

Please read the following essay, and write a brief (roughly half a typed page, or one full page handwritten) response to it in which you show a serious consideration of the author’s complex position. Feel free to express agreement, or disagreement, or both:

Do Sports Build Character or Damage It?

By Mark Edmundson

Students are encouraged to go to the article online, and make a print copy for easier reading. If you choose this option, please highlight the text of the article and use the Print menu option “Print Selection”, so that you don’t print the extensive comments that follow the article. FREE PRINTING is available in the Writing Center, B-260, and in the computer labs in F-170. Please don’t be shy about asking for assistance in either location!

–Below this line is information from previous semesters.–_______________________________________

Spring 2014

We will not have a final exam.

Wed. May 21st, 8-10am:

The final essay on Food Consciousness (Essay Four–Food Consciousness (.pdf)) will be due by 9:30am on Wednesday, May 21st — one print copy, please. The instructor will be in the classroom from 8am until 9:50am on this date. Please plan to come and retrieve your work, and get a course grade estimate.

*Students whose in-class essay earned a score of “4” or higher, and whose other formal essays (Zinn, Info-Media) earned satisfactory scores will not be asked to complete the essay; however, anyone who would like to complete this Food essay as a substitute for an unsatisfactory result on an earlier essay, or for missed homework credits, may do so. Please consult with the instructor on Wed. May 14th, or via email, if you have questions about your status.

* What your 1A in-class essay score suggests:          http://english.ucr.edu/elwr/scoring.html

Mon. May 19: No Class Meeting. Finals Week schedule is in effect. Be sure to check on when your other classes meet during Finals Week. Times tend to shift a little bit, and classes only meet ONCE.

Wednesday, May 14th: A completed Annotated Bibliography is due, Due, DUE! (One print copy, please.)

The information for text citations should include the following, in this order, separated by a period and a space — unless any piece of information is not knowable, in which case you can skip it:

Author or Director. Title–in italics–not quotation marks. Publication title, if different from the basic website name. Basic website through the .com/.org/.gov. Date of publication. Date you accessed it. Medium/Form.

Media forms: Web, Print, Audio, Video, Documentary Film, Lecture.

Please see May 7th for complete details and some helpful resources.

For Monday, May 12th: Please see May 7:

For Wednesday, May 7: DUE: Annotated Bibliography (A.B.) consisting of citations, summaries and evaluations of at least three of our class’ food texts.

BRING WHAT YOU HAVE, and come on-time, and you’ll be in good shape by the end of class!

The A.B. can be submitted Monday the 12th, but NOW IS THE TIME to get clear on how to build it.

Extra homework credit opportunity: Let us see your A.B.!!! –-Any students who would like to show files via the projector (web, PowerPoint, Word or .pdf) must email the files to the instructor prior to the class meeting:  cweidenbach@peralta.edu

EXAMPLE:  Here is an example of a former 1A student’s annotated bibliography, followed by her essay, with a list of Works Cited at the end. The Ann. Bib. starts just a little ways down the page. The example should clarify your mission. Take a look:

http://laney.edu/english/about/for-students/

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For Monday, May 5: Please read the following two articles, and write an annotation entry for each. Each annotation entry should have three parts: a citation, a BRIEF summary, and an evaluation paragraph. –See the UNC ‘handout’ under April 30 for explanations. Please type this one if you can, and be sure to save it!

Is Junk Food Really Cheaper Than Real Food?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/opinion/sunday/is-junk-food-really-cheaper.html?_r=1&pagewanted=print

Eat Right When the Money is Tight

http://www.nal.usda.gov/snap/EatRightWhenMoneysTight.pdf

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For Wednesday, April 30: 

Read (or re-read) the UNC’s ‘handout’ on Annotated Bibliographies

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For Monday, April 28:

Please read the following article featuring Michael Pollan, and then write 3 “rules” of your own: http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/news/20090323/7-rules-for-eating — Please note: The article continues onto pages 2 and 3; you will have to click on the continuation links to get to those pages and Pollan’s “food rules”.

In class: Film Screening: 2nd half of Food Inc.

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Click on this link for a list of Earth Week Events @ Laney College April 22-25th (Tuesday-Friday)

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*** Thursday, April 24: Peralta Ecology Festival, 11 am – 2 pm at the Channel of the Estuary near Laney College. Attend and write a one-page response for extra credit.

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Wednesday, April 23: Please read the following SHORT texts:

Slow Food Manifesto

Our Philosophy–from Slow Food International

In class: Film Screening: Food Inc.

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*** Tuesday, April 22: Sports nutritionist Dr. Clyde Wilson: “Eat Your Planet”–Nutrition science for students.  12:15 pm in The Forum *** Attend and write a one-page response for extra credit.

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Monday, April 21: In-Class Essays returned. Begin Food Consciousness unit.

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Monday the 14th and Wednesday the 16th: Spring Break: No class meetings.

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For Wednesday, April 9:

1. Read Chapter Four of  They Say / I Say selected chapters–a .pdf file–takes a few seconds to open

2. In-class essay. Students will read a 1-2-page essay, and respond in writing to a basic but focused set of questions. Please arrive promptly, so you’ll have as much time as possible.

* To prepare, you could read the Essay Exam prompts authored by Jeff Jacoby and Barack Obama–both linked as Word documents at this page:
http://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/english-1a/english-1a-documents-links/

The third formal essay will be assigned.

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For Monday, April 7: Please read these two linked resources:

Read the UNC’s ‘handout’ on Annotated Bibliographies

Read the introduction and Chapter One of They Say / I Say selected chapters–a .pdf file–takes a few seconds to open.

Revised Zinn essays can be submitted any time before April 23rd.

instructor feedback codes (.pdf)

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For Wednesday, April 2:

*** A print copy of Essay Two is due at 9:30am.***

For Monday March 31:

1) Please bring to class your first formal essay, whether or not it has been scored or if you’ve been asked to revise and re-submit it (R&R). The instructor will provide a ‘key’ for the feedback codes; we will work on some formal concerns regarding quotation and ‘grammar’; and we’ll do some reading comprehension work on Zinn’s chapter 2.

2) Keep working on Essay Two. It’s due Wed. April 2. No new reading assignments, but…

*  Here are two current info-media pieces that might be useful for the formal essay:

An important, high-information report on the U.S.’ relationship with Saudi Arabia:

http://www.democracynow.org/2014/3/26/obama_to_visit_saudi_arabia_key

News about a new “news” outlet–very interesting development:

https://firstlook.org/2014/02/19/matt-taibbi-lead-first-looks-next-digital-magazine/

–If you don’t know his work, here’s a collection of Taibbi’s previous work for Rolling Stone:

http://www.rollingstone.com/contributor/matt-taibbi

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For Wednesday, March 26th: THREE print copies of a typed draft of Essay Two–Information Media and Me is due for peer review. –You might want to email yourself a copy, or save it on a flash-drive, and print it for FREE at the Writing Center (B-260) or Tech Center (F-170).

For Monday, March 24th: * Class cancellation * If you would like to get feedback on your draft today, please visit the Writing Center (B-260) and ask about a fifteen-minute session with a tutor there.

For Monday, March 24th: (Optional) Bring a rough draft of Essay Two–Information Media and Me if you want to share some ideas and get some feedback prior to the actual draft-due date.

_________________________________

Thursday, March 20: Film screening and discussion:

HEIST: Who Stole the American Dream? -And How We Can Get It Back.

7pm, D-200, Free admission. Extra-credit available for attending.

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For Wednesday, March 19:

Please listen to this short segment from The Tavis Smiley Show, and write a one-sentence summary followed by a brief, one-paragraph response, saying what you feel like saying about what you hear:

http://www.tavissmileyradio.com/everett-glenn-and-george-johnson-racial-inequities-in-college-sports/

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For Monday, March 17: Re-Set

* If you have missed any previous written homework assignments or annotations, this is your chance to catch up. Reading quizzes cannot be made up, but all other written work can be.

* If your readership of Zinn’s Chapter 2 was incomplete, then your first formal essay will likely suffer from incomplete understanding. If you built Essay 1 without full comprehension of Chapter 2, the instructor recommends that you complete that reading, and re-write the essay with the fuller context in mind.

If you’ve basically kept up with all assignments, then breathe easy.

In class, we will screen the second half of HEIST.

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For Monday, March 10:

Please read the following two ‘print’ articles, and choose one of the audio/video links, and put them all to the SPJ test: In each case, is the SPJ Code of Ethics being followed, or violated? If you see a violation, please refer to the particular ethical item being violated. Please write your responses after clearly identifying the article or segment.

Two required readings:

by Robert Reich

At Long Last, Jason Collins Is the First by Dave Zirin

Choose one of these three A/V samples, and watch/listen to at least twenty minutes of it:

Economic Update from Feb. 28th: http://www.kpfa.org/archive/id/100511

Democracy Now! from Tuesday, February 25th: http://www.democracynow.org/2014/2/25/spies_of_mississippi_new_film_on

KPFA’s Guns & Butter from Feb. 12th: http://www.kpfa.org/archive/id/100023

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March 3 – Wednesday, March 5:

1–Please read and annotate the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics–it will take about 10-15 minutes. Here is a link to a good printable .pdf copy: http://www.spj.org/pdf/ethicscode.pdf

2–Please check out the “KPFA Program Grid” and look for non-music program titles that sound interesting to you. Pick one out, click on the title, and give it a listen, either on-air live at 94.1 fm, or online via recorded audio. (Most programs are one hour long. Click on the link that says “Listen to past programs”. Keep in mind that many programs have a brief intro, followed by KPFA News Headlines during the first 5-7 minutes. If you want to skip the headlines, you can slide the cursor forward.)

* The instructor recommends Hard Knock Radio and Democracy Now!(on KPFA) / democracynow.org

3–Write a one-paragraph (roughly half a page) response to the program you listen to, focusing on this question: Does the program follow the SPJ Code of Ethics?

 film promo poster
Thursday, Feb. 27th: Inequality for All film screening and discussion.
– Free admission –
Time: 7pm film, 9pm discussion
Place: Room D – 200 on the Laney College campus
From Roger Ebert’s review: “Even a charm monster like George Clooney probably couldn’t make “Inequality for All,” a documentary that is basically a 90-minute how-and-why dissection of the decline of our country’s middle class, any more persuasive and intermittently humorous than this popular professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley.”

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For Wednesday, Feb. 26th: The first formal essay is due (print copy) for grading. (See Feb. 24 for the nitty-gritty.)

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For Monday, Feb. 24th: A typed draft (print copy) of the first formal essay is due:

(Here is this assignment prompt as a Word document. It might be helpful to print a copy.)

Your mission: Use the three quotations from Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States that you selected for Feb. 19th to build the ‘body’ paragraphs of an essay in which you join the conversation about the historical foundation of the United States of America.

* The essay should be at least four paragraphs, typed, 11-12pt. font, 1.5- or double-spaced. There is no page-count, but it will likely take two or three pages to say what needs to be said. *If possible, please bring two or three copies of your draft. You can print in the Writing Center, B-260. And you can make copies for ten cents-per-page in the college library.

Suggestions / Recipe for Success:

1) Start with the quotable moments you chose for the homework assignment, or feel free to revise your selections and build around your ‘new’ choices.

2) Consider how those three paragraphs ‘add up’, and try to formulate a thesis statement — your ‘take-away’ or main idea after reading Zinn — that governs the essay.

3) If you use your thesis statement in a classic introductory paragraph, then consider a concluding paragraph that brings your ideas to bear on our current times: What does Zinn’s history tell you about life in 2014?

4) If you’d rather present your thesis in a concluding paragraph, then consider writing an intro paragraph that will ‘hook’ a reader, or whet a reader’s appetite for reading subsequent paragraphs.

5) Since we are a unique class with a partial emphasis on and sports culture, you may want to relate Zinn’s history to the world of sports.

6) Be sure to name Zinn appropriately, as well as the book title and/or chapter title. It’s a writer’s job to be clear about the texts s/he refers to.

7) Remember that all of our class’ shared texts, lectures and discussions are relevant to this assignment. Feel free to work those ideas into your essay. If you mention any other texts, be sure to mention the authors and any titles appropriately.

8) When in doubt, do what feels right. We will have time to deal with specific concerns during a review of the drafts on Monday the 24th.

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For Wednesday, Feb. 19:

Drawing the Color Line, Chapter 2 of Zinn’s …People’s History…

2. As you read, look for some quotable statements, either especially clear and meaningful, or somehow dubious or problematic.

3. Select three sentences from different sections of the chapter to present via quotation, and follow up each quoted statement with your own statement in response.

this page at the UNC Writing Center’s website.

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* Monday, Feb. 17 HOLIDAY–no class meeting *

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*Extra-credit opportunity: Film screening and discussion:

 

* The instructor will not be able to attend these screenings, but will post information on whether or not students can attend for free as soon as he finds out! A six-minute video clip about the film is at this site:

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/i-just-wanna-ball–3

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Rally to demand independent investigation and prosecution of police who have killed people.

Thursday, Feb. 13th, 3pm, 1515 Clay Street, downtown Oakland.

https://www.facebook.com/events/684595568258092/

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For Wednesday, Feb. 12: Zinn and Rice (continued from Monday the 10th)

Please write short answers (one or two sentences each) in response to the following questions:

Zinn:

1. Why did Roderigo not get the gold coin Columbus offered as a reward to the first sailor to spot land?

2. What does Zinn say is the big difference between writing/telling history and making maps? (Hint: it involves the concept of distortion.)

Rice:

1. What does Rice say was/is Martin Luther King’s great accomplishment?

2. Rice says King (and many others) showed people how to defeat racist terror/oppression. What is the strategy the Civil Rights Movement’s leaders taught?

*The instructor apologizes for the late posting. Some registration concerns got in his way Monday morning.

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Extra-Credit opportunity: Monday Feb. 10, 7pm, Laney Theater, FREE: Film Screening: Spike Lee’s masterpiece, Do the Right Thing

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For Monday, Feb. 10:

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For Wednesday, Feb.5:

Please check out this calendar of Black History Month events at Laney, and make a note about which one(s) you would consider attending, and why. (Click the image to enlarge.)

 

For Monday, Feb. 3:

The Edge of Sports, and choose one that you find most interesting. After reading closely, write one strong paragraph in which you 1) name the author and title, 2) express what you see as Zirin’s main idea, then 3) say what YOU want to say about the subject. [Feel free to quote from Zirin if you see fit.]

Extra-credit opportunity: If you watch the Super Bowl on Sunday, please make a few notes on anything you see that reminds you of the themes of Zirin’s film Not Just a Game. You can keep these notes in a notebook if you wish, and be ready to show your notes to the instructor on Monday.

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Syllabus-1A

In class, we will watch the second half of Not Just a Game.

Tuesday, Jan. 28th at 6pm (live–but also available afterward on video/audio): Extra-credit opportunity: Watch the President’s State of the Union address, and write a one-page review of the speech, the Republican follow-up, and/or commentary. [Do not summarize the speech, but get right to your response. What do you think of the pageantry, the ‘buzz’, the speech itself, or the reactions of various people? Try to name names whenever possible.] When the speech is over, it will be available on video from a number of media outlets, including:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/sotu

Here’s a preview article from PBS, a moderately corporate-conservative media outlet:

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2014/01/obama-looks-to-move-beyond-tough-year-with-state-of-the-union-message.html

 

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Wednesday, January 22: Welcome! Registration and a brief in-class writing activity.

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(Below this line is information from last fall.)

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Assignments & Announcements, Fall 2013

Wednesday, Dec. 11, *8-10am: Last chance for students in the morning class to retrieve work and get an early grade estimate. Please drop by the classroom sometime between *8 and 10am. This is our only meeting time during this week. (Please note early start time.)

Monday, Dec. 9, Noon-2pm: Last chance for students in the afternoon class to retrieve work and get an early grade estimate. Please drop by the classroom sometime between Noon and 2pm. This is our only meeting time during this week.

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For Monday, Dec. 2 / Wednesday, Dec. 4: Last week of class meetings!

Due: One print copy each: Annotated Bibliography, Thesis Statement, and Argument Outline. (The thesis statement and outline can be combined as one document.)

* Optional: Bring three print copies on Monday if you want to get some feedback from classmates and the instructor; one revised copy would then be due Wednesday the 4th.

Here is a very successful thesis-driven outline by one of this semester’s 1A students. Feel free to use it as a model for your own outline:

Thesis and Argument Essay Outline

Feel free to use one of these templates for building your outline:

5-paragraph_argument_architecture

Expanded argument architecture

* OVERDUE: Formal Essay 3–details below under Nov. 20th.

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For Monday, Nov. 25th:

THREE COPIES of the Annotated Bibliography is due. (Your A.B. should have five entries, each consisting of a citation, summary, and evaluation.) Please see the Final Essay Project page for details and examples.

Recommended process: Have a “working thesis” in mind to guide your thinking and selection of source texts. This very helpful page explains thesis development very well: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/

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For Wednesday, Nov. 20th:

Formal Essay due: Write a two-page (max.) essay developing a unique thesis in response to one of the two documentary films and at least one related text:

Option 1:  Why We Fight, dir. by Eugene Jarecki, 2006. *This is a new link that actually includes sound!

Related Texts: Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Farewell Address–this link provides audio, video and text.

                            It’s Time to Talk About What Troops Leave Unsaid by Jonathan Raab.

Here (WHY WE FIGHT notes Oct 12) are the instructor’s notes on the film Why We Fight.

Option 2: Inside Job, dir. by Charles Ferguson, 2011.

Related Texts: Nobody Should Shed a Tear for JP Morgan Chase by Matt Taibbi

                              Chase Isn’t the Only Bank in Trouble by Matt Taibbi

GREAT opening segment of The Daily Show about the J.P Morgan-Chase settlement and the DISHONEST reporting about it:

http://www.thedailyshow.com/full-episodes/wed-october-23-2013-charles-krauthammer

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Monday, Nov. 18th:

1. Second A.B. entry due. Please submit together with your first entry, with any appropriate revisions.

(We will work with formal citations in class. For now, please rely on the MLA section of this tutorial. If you are confused, then at least be sure to name authors and titles.)

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Wednesday, Nov. 13th: 

1. Please read (TBA) and Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Farewell Address — Sorry about the pop-up ad. Just close it.

2. Also read It’s Time to Talk About What Troops Leave Unsaid by Jonathan Raab.

A reading quiz (worth 2 homework credits) will begin our class meeting. Please come on-time, or you will miss the quiz.

3. If you have not yet submitted a formalized, typed annotation entry for one of this semester’s texts, PLEASE BE SURE TO BRING ONE ON THIS DAY! We will review them in class, and get ready to build more as part of the final essay project.

* In class, we will screen the last part of Inside Jobor maybe the first part of Why We Fight.

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Monday, Nov. 11th: Veterans Day holiday–No class meetings in the Peralta Colleges.

Please check out the IAVA, and tell any veterans you know to check them out, too. IAVA.ORG

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For Wednesday, Nov. 6th:

Please read this NEW webpage ‘handout’ on Annotated Bibliographies: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/annotated-bibliographies/

— and be sure you have read the Final Essay Project description.

For Monday, Nov. 4th:

We will watch the first part of Inside Job (2011) dir. by Charles Ferguson.

9am class:

1–Please be sure you have read the Annotated Bibliography links posted under Oct. 30th.

2–Please “formalize” your annotation entry–i.e., edit, revise, and type up the one you began in class on the 28th/30th. (If you’ve already submitted a typed copy, your work is done!) Remember: The Ehrenreich example on the OWL page is the best example–and don’t worry about the format for your citation–yet!

Noon Class: Wednesday Group: Please complete the above assignment for Wed. Nov. 6, and read the explanation of the Final Essay Project.

Noon Class Fluency Group: Please read the essay Mother Tongue by Amy Tan — you might need to hit “CTRL -/+” to get a clear view. 

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For Wednesday, Oct. 30th:

1–Read the two web-based resources below on “annotated bibliography”, and

2–Write/formalize an entry for ONE text our class has shared, including a citation, a very brief summary, and a brief evaluation:

A good explanation of what an annotated bibliography is:
Cornell University Library—How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography
http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill28.htm

A good set of examples of annotated bibliography entries is at OWL.
The entry for Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickeled and Dimed is a very good example:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/03/

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For Monday, Oct. 28th:

* Exams/Qualifiers will be returned.

* No new reading or writing is assigned–BUT if you have not completed the first half of Howard Zinn’s Chapter One, please go back and complete it. (See Oct. 14th for the link and the halfway mark.)

* Noon class only: The fluency group will meet for the first time on this day. The other half of the class will meet on Wednesday only this week.

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Wed, Oct. 23rd:  NEW DATE: In-Class Essay Exam (credit/no-credit)

–and qualifier for partial course credit-by-examination.

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Mon, Oct. 21st:

* Please read and respond to the Barack Obama speech/essay as directed in class–basically the same as the 1-2-3 steps for the Jacoby article below. (If you don’t have a print copy, the Obama document is posted on the Documents and Links page.)

Also…

* Please read Jeff Jacoby’s Bring Back Flogging, and write one solid paragraph in which you

1) name the author and title,

2) state in your own words what you see as the author’s main, unifying idea, and

3) give at least a hint about your own ideas as you wish to respond to the article.

Use the voice that thinks best as you prepare your thoughts and plot out what you want to say; then be sure to write and edit your sentences in your best SAE mode.

* For more essay exam preparation, please see the Documents and Links page for advice and some more sample exam prompts.

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For Wed, Oct. 16th: Please be sure you have read A More Perfect Union by Barack Obama. We will prepare for Monday’s in-class essay exam, and look at an example of a successful student response.

A More Perfect Union by Senator Barack Obama

While running for President in 2008, Senator Barack Obama was pushed by his opponents to discuss his perspective on “race” in America, particularly regarding whites and blacks. Here is most of what he said, an excerpted section of a speech that was used for the 1A exam.

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For Mon, Oct. 14th:

1. READ: Please read the first “half +” of the first chapter of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States–up to where Zinn writes, “The reader may as well know that before going on,” a little more than halfway through the chapter. (This reading may take a good hour or more. If you want a print copy, please highlight the text up to the halfway point, and use “print selection” in the print menu. The book is also on reserve at the College Library, and available at most new & used bookstores.)

2. Annotate? Of course! –As you do, please take note of the way Zinn refers to other historians’ writing.

3. WRITE: Do you see any They Say / I Say ‘moves’? (Hint: You SHOULD see such moves, especially where Zinn writes about historian Samuel Eliot Morison.) –WRITE a short paragraph in which you quote one or two sentences from Zinn as he makes such a move. In this paragraph:

–Please observe the conventions of naming authors and titles right in your sentences–and do NOT cite authors’ names in parentheses at the end of sentences, as doing so would violate the conventions of naming/attribution.

–Please also “frame” each quotation by introducing it, presenting the quoted language, then either paraphrasing the quotation or commenting on it, or both. If you need advice on such “framing”, you can consult Chapter 3 of They Say / I Say on reserve in the College Library, or look at the quotation section of the OWL site, or use any published writing that involves quotation as a model.

–Typed is best; handwritten is okay: If you don’t type this paragraph, please write very clearly, so all the detail and punctuation are visible and legible.

Here’s the link to Zinn’s whole book via its chapter list: Howard Zinn: A People’s History Of The United States

9am class (especially): Here are the links to info explaining the TARP bank bailout of 2007-8, and showing who “holds” U.S. National Debt/”paper”/Treasury Bills/Savings Bonds:

TARP bailout levels:
http://projects.propublica.org/bailout/
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Who Owns the U.S. National Debt?
How Stuff Works (no particular political bias) says:
http://people.howstuffworks.com/5-united-states-debt-holders.htm#page=10
Townhall.com–which seems to have an overt “conservative” political bias, agrees:
http://finance.townhall.com/columnists/politicalcalculations/2013/01/21/who-really-owns-the-us-national-debt-n1493555/page/full

Here’s a link to one of the best Financial Sector reporters in the nation, Matt Taibbi: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/taibblog

And here’s that SCARY “debt clock”: http://www.usdebtclock.org/

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Wed, Oct. 9th: If you haven’t done so already, please hit the Up Front link posted for Oct. 7th, and listen to the interview with John Nichols, making notes along the way–essentially this is a chance to catch up with the assignment for Monday.

In class, we will look at at least one in-class essay exam, in preparation for an upcoming ungraded in-class essay exam that will serve as an opportunity to qualify for a fast-track, early completion of this course. The tentative date for this exam/qualifier is Monday, Oct. 21st.

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For Monday, Oct. 7th:

1. Please listen to the interview segment (07:00-59:00) of the KPFA program Up Front for October 2, 2013:

http://www.kpfa.org/archive/id/95819

2. As you listen, write down some notes on what you hear–whatever sounds interesting or truly informative to you. You might also want to write out a couple of questions that come to mind as you listen. The interviewee’s name is John Nichols.

3. Think about whether John Nichols is speaking as a REPORTER or as a COMMENTATOR–or BOTH. See how well he follows this SPJ Code of Ethics rule: “Analysis and commentary should be labeled and not misrepresent fact or context.”

–We will be discussing this during part of our class meeting. The more specific your notes, the better! Suggestion: Use the clock on the audio link to mark specific segments that you find interesting. For example: From 33:15-34:07 Nichols describes the “Tea Party” origins…

* Please check out the “KPFA Program Grid” and look for program titles that sound interesting to you. If you have time, give them a listen. (Remember, many programs have a brief intro, followed by KPFA News Headlines during the first 5-7 minutes. If you want to skip the headlines, you can slide the cursor forward.)

* Also, if you haven’t yet read the Oct. 2 reading, please make sure you are caught up by Monday!

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For Wednesday, Oct. 2: Please read the Introduction and Chapter One of They Say / I Say–which is on reserve at the college library, and available via this link:

They Say / I Say selected chapters–This is a .pdf file, and may take a few seconds to open.

We will be using this book’s approach in responding to various commentary articles and other texts during the remaining weeks of this semester.

Here’s a sneak-preview of a couple of Dave Zirin op-eds we’ll look at for next Wednesday the 9th:

http://www.edgeofsports.com/2013-09-22-865/index.html

http://www.edgeofsports.com/2013-09-23-866/index.html

 

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For Monday, Sept. 30:

1–Please read and annotate the Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics–it will take about 10-15 minutes. Here is a link to a good printable .pdf copy: http://www.spj.org/pdf/ethicscode.pdf

2–Please check out the following information-media links, and…

3–write roughly one page about any principles in the SPJ Code that any or all of these journalists* seem to be noticeably upholding or violating:

Hard Knock Radio–be sure to listen past the news headlines. The instructor recommends the Sept. 17th program.

http://www.democracynow.org/–again, be sure to watch/listen/read beyond the headlines.

http://www.thedailyshow.com/full-episodes/tue-september-24-2013-richard-dawkins

* Jon Stewart is a comedian, but his show is largely journalistic–see for yourself!

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For Wednesday, Sept. 25th:

1–Please read, watch, or listen to at least one of the information-media outlets listed in this Excel document: Information Media Guide, and…

2–Write a half-page or so (one page max.) about what value it/they seem/s to offer.

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Monday, Sept. 23rd: Laney Theater, 7:30pm: FREE film sponsored by ASLC: Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo

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For Monday, Sept. 23rd:

Writing: The first formal essay is due. Please submit a clean print copy, accompanied by a print copy of a draft reviewed by a classmate.

Reading: Nothing assigned–Want to look ahead? http://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/media-links/

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For Wednesday, Sept. 18th:

9am class, especially: Please be sure you have reviewed a classmate’s draft, and had your draft reviewed by a classmate.

Our system for this review is to underline “juicy” (new, fresh, challenging, unusual) ideas, and to squiggly-underline ideas that are “shaky” (inaccurate, unclear, or unspecific). Also feel free to write questions or comments in the margins. Last, please advise on whether the essay seems to have workable opening and closing moves–and whether it could use a formal introduction and/or conclusion paragraph.

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For Monday, Sept. 16th:

RESPONSE to Dr. King’s Letter from Birmingham Jail, and write an essay of 3* to 5 paragraphs in response, with each ‘body’ paragraph developing a different idea you feel like expressing after reading these three related texts. (Feel free to make connections to other readings and the film Heist as well.)

http://sojo.net/magazine/2013/04/we-dare-not-postpone-action

* If you wish, please feel free to avoid writing classic introductory and conclusion paragraphs; instead, find effective language to open and close the three paragraphs so that the three paragraphs feel like an essay.

Academic Nitty-Gritty: Whatever format you use, please name the texts you mention or quote from, and do so in a graceful and minimal way.

Name authors/directors by first & last names the first time you mention them; afterward last names generally suffice.

Book, film, essay and other titles are these days often presented in italics–and on this website in bold italics.

We should always try to decide what syntax is best for our purposes; yet if we seek the approval of anyone who has published their style guide, we should do our best to adhere to their guidelines.

Bonus Link: Audio recording of King himself reading his Letter…

AUDIO: Recording of “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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For Wednesday, Sept. 11:

Please read the clergymen’s letter to which Dr. King responded:

Clergy Letter to King

———————————————-

For Monday, Sept. 9:

Letter from Birmingham Jail.

This reading will take at least a full hour, so please plan accordingly. To read it best, READ IT OUT LOUD–or second-best, read it ‘out-loud-in-your-head’.

 

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/maxim

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Wednesday, Sept. 4:

 

–9am class: Please read both (closely, attentively, actively), and respond (see Aug. 26, 2-3 for advice) to one of the following articles from Dave Zirin’s website:

http://www.edgeofsports.com/2013-07-15-852/index.html

http://www.edgeofsports.com/2013-05-09-839/index.html

–Noon class: Please read (closely, attentively, actively) and respond (see Aug. 26, 2-3 for advice) to the following article from the New York Times’ Opinion blogosphere:

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Wednesday, August 28th:

9am class: We will finish watching HEIST.

Noon class: We will meet on the Laney Quad for the special event commemorating the 1963 March on Washington for jobs and economic justice.

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For Monday, August 26: Seek, Read, & Write

1. Please seek out an interesting Opinion/Editorial article from a newspaper, magazine or website–an article you think would be a good read for the whole class.

2. Read the article closely, and use whatever system you want to annotate the article–that is, write some notes on it, or underline key words and ideas, or use a highlighter, or draw little symbols in the margin. If you don’t have a print copy, then make some notes in a notebook, or on another sheet of paper. (We will discuss the articles in class, and if you annotate, you will have a record of your thinking to help keep our in-class work ‘meaty’.)

3. Finally, write a quick one-sentence summary of the article, and then write one juicy paragraph in response–possibly expressing your sense of agreement or disagreement, or both, with the article’s author. Let your real reaction to the article’s ideas determine how you decide to frame and phrase your ideas.

Format: Typed, 11-12-pt font, double-spaced would be great; hand-written, single-spaced is also fine.

Quantity: Roughly one page, if formatted as above.

This is an informal writing assignment, so don’t spend much time worrying about grammar, spelling, etc.–just focus on ‘speaking’ directly, and being concise, and getting straight to the point. Write fast & loose, like a master card player!

9am class: Please choose your article from Dave Zirin’s “Edge of Sports” site–edgeofsports.com/archive, writing your response to whichever article you find most interesting. In a sense, you are also nominating articles for the future whole-class reading list. (Noon class: You are welcome to read and respond to this site’s articles, too!)

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Below this line is info from Spring 2013

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HERE as a Word document.

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Wednesday, May 22:

Morning class only: Please come by the classroom between 8AM and 10AM to retrieve your final essay and any other work.

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Monday, May 20:

Noon-2pm class only: Please come by the classroom to retrieve your final essay and any other work.

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For Wednesday, May 15:

DUE: Final Essay, including Works Cited (one print copy only, please)

–This is our last regular class meeting.

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For Monday, May 13:

DUE: THREE COPIES of the Final Essay draft. (These are due at thirty minutes past the hour, 9:30am/12:30pm.)

–No Works Cited list required–but you’ll need to get it ready for the Final Essay submission on the 15th.

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For Monday, May 6–OR Wednesday, May 8:

Due: THREE COPIES of your Annotated Bibliography (Ann. Bib. or A.B.), with FIVE ENTRIES.

Other due dates coming up:

Wed May 8      Essay development workshop–bring rough/current drafts
Mon May 13    Essay Draft Due–typed, substantial, nearly complete (3 copies)
Wed May 15    Essay Due

Here’s the link for the Final Essay project prompt and calendar:

http://laney.edu/chris-weidenbach/english-1a/final-essay-project-english-1a/

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For Wednesday, May 1:

final essay

Read: these two web-based resources on  “annotated bibliography”:

A good explanation of what an annotated bibliography is:
Cornell University Library—How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography
http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill28.htm

A good set of samples of annotated bibliography entries is at OWL.
The entry for Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickeled and Dimed is a very good example:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/03/

.

For Monday, April 29:

)

These two links will be very helpful for building a GREAT THESIS STATEMENT:

What is a thesis statement?
http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/thesis_def.html

Finalizing your thesis statement:
http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/thesis_complete.html

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For Wednesday, April 24:

They Say / I Say–this link will open a .pdf file–it may take a few seconds to open.

7 Rules for Eating: Choose Food Over Food-Like Substances, Food Writer Michael Pollan Tells CDC

by , WebMD Health News; Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

3–Then please use one or two of the templates in They Say/I Say Chapter 1, and write ONE PARAGRAPH in response to the ideas in the article about Pollan’s speech.

.

.

For Monday, April 22:

What were women doing to establish equal rights with men? What did African-Americans, Native Americans, and immigrants do to resist the pressures of racism? –In each case, what was the outcome of these struggles? How do they connect with today’s America?

________

(what had been happening?)________.

.

For Wednesday, April 17:

Read: Stick with Zinn, Chapter 11–and be ready for a quiz!

: Please write two short paragraphs:

1–one showing an example of what industrial business owners did to maximize their profits;

2–and one showing an example of workers successfully organizing to protect their interests.

* 9am class: If you already submitted two workable examples on Monday the 15th, then you have already earned this homework credit. If you need to supplement your examples, feel free.

.

For Monday, April 15: Re-Scheduled: 

–Don’t get too caught up in the details, names and dates; read for the story Zinn is telling about people, power and government.

* The chapter is lengthy, so your annotations should be general, just hitting the highlights.

A short-answer quiz is likely, so be prepared!

.

For Wednesday, April 10: Re-Scheduled:

Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Farewell Address–this link provides audio, video and text. A great way to read the speech is to start the audio/video, and listen while you read through the text.

WHY WE FIGHT notes Oct 12) are the instructor’s notes on the film Why We Fight.

*–In class, we will watch the second half of Why We Fight, dir. by Eugene Jarecki.

For Monday, April 8:

Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Farewell Address–this link provides audio, video and text. A great way to read the speech is to start the audio/video, and listen while you read through the text.

Why We Fight, dir. by Eugene Jarecki. (The instructor’s notes on the film will be posted as soon as he can find them!)

And Monday, April 15th will be the last chance to submit the Animal Farm/The Farm essay.

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For Wednesday, April 3: Two very important readings/annotations:

1–Read this short version of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (this page shows Articles 1-15; for Articles 16-30, hit the “next” button, or use this link: UDHR-articles 16-30)

–Please annotate the UDHR in terms of which rights/Articles make perfect sense to you, and/or which ones are unclear, and/or which ones seem unreasonable or unworkable. (You could copy the articles into a Word document, and annotate that way, or make your own list of unclear or unreasonable Articles on a separate page or document.)
.
<span
–Also, if you’d like to look ahead a bit, check out chapters 11 and 15–You’ll find them by clicking on “Table of Contents” at the top of the Chapter One page.

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***Monday April 1st: Due to instructor illness, the class meeting is cancelled.
–This is NOT an April Fool’s Day joke!*** 
This site will be updated by 9am with the assignments for Wednesday and beyond.
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.
For Monday, March 18: Critical thinking requires knowledge of standards.

1. Please read The Society for Professional Journalism’s Code of Ethics: the ‘rules’ reporters and news agencies are supposed to follow in order to maintain the public trust:

http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp

.
2. Also please read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:
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Wednesday, March 13:

.
Noon class: We will attend the Laney Theatre’s production of The Farm from Noon-1:45pm (estimated). PLEASE arrive by 11:30 to get a good, central seat, and by 11:45 to get a comfortable, workable seat.
The theater does not allow food or beverages during performances, so please come nourished, hydrated, and ready to engage with what you witness. *This is the easiest way to see the play, which is a necessary component of building the formal essay; but students are welcome to see ANY of the performances instead of this one, if they wish.
.
9am class: YOU ARE MOST WELCOME to join us at the Noontime performance, in lieu of attending our regular morning class meeting, or in addition to it.
.
For the 9am class meeting, please survey the following four (4) texts regarding Food Security prior to class:

 

2. 10 Lies and Misconceptions Spread By Mainstream Nutritionists (online print)

.
Monday, March 11:
***9am class: Pist Douglas Bruce will give us an introduction to the garden, and a quick tour; then from 10-11am, any students who want to stay and weed-water-whatever can press on with CW until 11. (Noon class: Our tentatively scheduled date for a Garden session is Wed. March 20th.)
.
Noon class: Please survey the following texts regarding Food Security prior to class:

_________________________________________________________________

For Wednesday, March 6:
1. Please read (or re-read) and ANNOTATE A More Perfect Union by Senator Barack Obama. You can either print the document and annotate that copy, or write your notes in a notebook or in a document of your own.
Annotation here means: highlighting, underlining, writing notes or questions in the margins, or anything that makes a record of what you think about as you read. (I will collect these, or check them in students’ notebooks at the beginning of class. –CW)
.
2. Please catch up with any reading you may have not yet completed–including Animal Farm, Dr. King’s …Letter…, the introduction to They Say/I Say, and Barack Obama’s A More Perfect Union.
.
For Monday, March 4: Two reading assignments:

1. Please read and annotate the Introduction to They Say/I Say–here is the .pdf file:

The book is also on reserve at the TEXTBOOKS desk in the Laney Library. Any edition of the book will work.

2. Please read and annotate A More Perfect Union by Senator Barack Obama. (Background: While running for President in 2008, Senator Barack Obama was pushed by his opponents to discuss his perspective on “race” in America, which he did in this Philadelphia speech.)
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For Wednesday, Feb. 27:Read Overview of Rhetorical Analysis (selections from the wikibook Rhetoric and Composition); also please look at this copy of Dr. King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”–Rhetorical Analysis– (opens in Word) This is the color-coded copy of Dr. King’s letter, highlighting his rhetorical appeals to his audience’s senses of logic (logos), ethics (ethos), and compassion (pathos). Website: http://faculty.millikin.edu/~moconner/writing/king1a.html.For Monday, Feb. 25:Read:  First, the Clergymen’s letter, and then Dr. King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”–the links are posted below. (Dr. King’s Letter will take at least an hour to read closely–please plan accordingly.
Write: Using summary, quotation or paraphrase, write about one highlight in “the Clergymen say/King responds” mode. (1/2 page max)Clergy Letter to KingLetter from Birmingham Jail, Martin Luther King, Jr., 1963

–We will also spend some time with Animal Farm, including that reading quiz you’ve been waiting for!

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For Wednesday, Feb. 20:

1–Please read on through the end of Animal Farm.

2–Please read, watch, or listen to at least one of the information-media outlets listed in the document distributed in class on the 7th (an e-copy is HERE: Information Media Guide), and…

3–Write a half-page or so (one page max.) about what value it/they seem/s to offer. ( * See above for one very interesting option!)

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Monday, Feb. 18–NO CLASS MEETINGS AT PERALTA

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For Wednesday, Feb. 13:

1–Please read on through (and including) Chapter 7 of Animal Farm.

* Here is a link to an audio book version of Animal Farm: ANIMAL FARM AUDIO BOOK

(The instructor suggests reading the print/text copy while listening to the narration. This will keep you reading actively, and at the speed of speech, which is the best way to read a good story, especially one as dense as this one.)
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For Monday, Feb. 11:
Please read through Chapter 5 of Orwell’s Animal Farm. A short-answer quiz will begin our class. As you read, try to make a note of any evidence in the text that tells you something important about each character/animal. Clearly the animals are intended to reflect human tendancies; what do you notice Orwell telling us about how people act regarding social/political order and organization? Please note: any writing you do as you read will be useful for a short formal essay on reading the book and seeing the Theater Arts production in March. (That essay assignment will be posted soon.)
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For Wednesday, Feb. 6: Please read the first two chapters of George Orwell’s Animal Farm.
Any print copy will work, or you can use this online link:
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Monday, Feb. 4: Class meetings are cancelled due to instructor illness.
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For Wednesday, Jan. 30: Please visit the website http://www.edgeofsports.com/archive.html and find an article that is interesting to you–then write about 1/2 a page (informal, fast-and-loose) explaining why that article gets your attention.
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For Monday, Jan. 28: NO ASSIGNMENTS–ENJOY YOUR WEEKEND!
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EXTRA-CREDIT OPPORTUNITY:
Wellstone Democratic Renewal Club
special film showing
“The Healthcare Movie” about how Canada built its Single-Payer Healthcare/Insurance systemThursday, January 24th
Humanist Hall
390 27th Street, Oakland
(between Broadway and Telegraph)
potluck at 6:15PM, film at 7PM;
If you come for the potluck, please bring something to share!
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Below this line is information from Fall 2012, which will soon be purged.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
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WEDNESDAY, DEC. 12th: 9-11am class only: Special time: 8am-9:45am.
Please come by the classroom between 8 and 9:45am to retrieve any remaining coursework. All work will be graded, and the instructor can give students the earliest indication of their course grades. This final round of feedback is very important, especially since many students have not yet gotten feedback on some of their short essays.
–It will be perfectly okay for students to ‘hit-and-run’ on this day.
–The instructor will also have a letter for students as we close out this semester.
The 9-11am class will not meet on Monday the 10th. Be sure to check your other classes’ scheduled meeting times during Finals Week, since classes will only meet once during that week, and sometimes the meeting times are slightly different than usual.
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MONDAY, DEC. 10th: Noon-2pm class only:

Please come by the classroom between Noon and 1:45pm to retrieve any remaining coursework. All work will be graded,, and the instructor can give students the earliest indication of their course grades. This final round of feedback is actually very important, especially since many students have not yet gotten feedback on some of their short essays.
–It will be perfectly okay for students to ‘hit-and-run’ on this day.
–The instructor will also have a letter for students as we close out this semester.
The Noon-2pm class will not meet on Wednesday the 12th. Be sure to check your other classes’ scheduled meeting times during Finals Week, since classes will only meet once during that week, and sometimes the meeting times are slightly different than usual.
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For Monday OR Wednesday, Dec. 3rd OR 5th:
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 A print copy of the final essay is due.
THE “FINAL ESSAY PROJECT” webpage with the assignment prompt and calendar
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The following OPTIONS could earn you up to four (4) bonus credits:
OPTIONAL: Bring your best draft on Monday, and get some quick advice from classmates and the instructor: Read us your essay (or as many paragraphs as time permits), and use us as a ‘focus group’ to test-market your essay. Then you’ll have forty-six hours to make any changes.  (2 bonus credits available for effective participation–sharing your essay, noting the response of your focus group, and giving at least one classmate attentive, constructive feedback. )
OPTIONAL: Email the instructor with the text of your essay pasted into the message box–no attachments, please. We can project the text so the class can read it, if you like, during the focus group session on Monday–and/or, with your permission, your essay will be considered for publication on the course website. (1 more bonus credit available for either option, and another if the essay is chosen for publication on the website.)

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For Monday OR Wednesday, Nov. 26th OR 28th:

Please bring THREE (3) COPIES of your essay draft to one of our class meetings; and feel free to take the other day “off” to work on the essay or other coursework.
These links will be very helpful for building a GREAT THESIS STATEMENT:

What is a thesis statement?
http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/thesis_def.html

Finalizing your thesis statement:
http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/thesis_complete.html

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For Wednesday, Nov. 21st: Due: Annotated Bibliography with 5 entries.
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Here are three links that might be helpful for building the final essay:
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Powerful ten-minute video of a military veteran sharing his experience surviving war and facing a difficult transition back into civilian life:
–and here is the home page for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America: http://iava.org/
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Food link: Michael Pollan on Democracy Now!
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Here’s a link to a site where you can see the film Inside Job:
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*** FYI: Two links related to Inside Job and the Banking Fraud/Collapse topic:
The housing crisis has had a huge cost even for those who have kept their homes: Center for Responsible Lending…. http://fb.me/21WzPZxK6
Recent news on the “claw-back”: Federal government sues BofA for $1B over mortgage fraud scheme. Story developing … http://fb.me/2ucwapVWh
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For Wednesday, Nov. 14:
  • Please review the annotated bibliography links posted under Nov. 7 below, and the explanation/prompt for the Final Essay Project, linked at left.
  • Please also read this recent op-ed about our military service personnel and veterans:

http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/27/its-time-to-talk-about-what-troops-leave-unsaid/?pagewanted=print

  • The third short essay is due unless you’ve already submitted three.
  • Please also give some thought to what you would like to read/think/write about for the final formal essay. If you want to draft a trial thesis statement and/or proposal paragraph explaining your focus for this essay, please bring it to class. Otherwise, we will write these in class on this day. (More info on the final formal essay is on the “Final Essay Project” page.)

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Monday, Nov. 12 is the Veterans Day Holiday–no class meetings at Peralta.

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For Wed. Nov. 7 

Read: these two web-based resources on  “annotated bibliography”:

A good explanation of what an annotated bibliography is:
Cornell University Library—How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography
http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill28.htm

A good set of samples of annotated bibliography entries is at OWL.
The entry for Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickeled and Dimed is a very good example:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/03/

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* Monday, Nov. 5th, 6:00pm to 7:30pm: Two extra HW credits available. See Extra Credit Opportunities webpage for details.
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For Mon. Nov. 5

Election Commission–info session on our unfinished election business. (See the Election Commission webpage for details.)

Please read: Slow Food/Food Security Links: 1 and 2 are assigned; 3 is optional (see below)

1. The Slow Food Manifesto

http://www.slowfood.com/_2010_pagine/com/popup_pagina.lasso?-id_pg=121

2. Carlo Petrini’s Address to the EU Parliament During the CAP 2020 Reform Conference

http://www.slowfood.com/international/food-for-thought/slow-talk/147430/carlo-petrinis-address-to-the-eu-parliament-during-the-cap-2020-reform-conference-/q=FC4E4B

3. –If you are confused or especially interested by 1 and 2 above, then please read this page, too:

http://www.slowfood.com/international/2/our-philosophy

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For Wednesday Oct. 31st

1–Second one-page essay due.

2–Student Election Commission reports and recommendations–please be ready to tell our class what you’ve learned about the proposition or office you selected, and give us your recommendation. Your summary-and-recommendation write-up can be handwritten or typed, and is informal, but should be clear and legible. If you don’t want to suggest how we should vote, then please try to recommend some specific reading or way of thinking. If two students are signed up for the same ballot item, they can either work together or separately on the summary and recommendation.

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For Monday Oct. 29th

Read the following documents expressing Human Rights Standards:

the Bill of Rights

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Black Panther Party Ten-Point Program for Human Development

(Here is the wikipedia page on the Panthers: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Panther_Party)

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*Pre-election event: Wed. Oct. 24: Deepen your election perspective:
The Laney branch of the International Socialist Organization will discuss the upcoming election at 6:30pm, Laney F-200.
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For Wednesday, Oct. 24th:

1–Please be ready for a reading quiz on Zinn’s Chapter 1. We also will watch the second half of the film Inside Job–feel free to bring QUIET snacks.

2–This is a benchmark date to submit your first of three short formal essays.  If you aren’t ready to do so, don’t panic–but please be sure you’ve looked at the Calendar page and the Three Short Formal Essays page, and get ready to submit one such essay each of the next three weeks. * Please see the “Three Short Formal Essays” webpage for updated directions.

Also, if you plan to write about the recession/banking industry collapse, you will want to read Matt Taibbi’s article “Why Isn’t Wall Street in Jail?”  If you want to print it, please highlight just the text of the article, and use the “print selection” command.

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Tuesday, Oct. 23rd:  Special election info event:

Get a better handle on the propositions and issues by attending the League of Women Voters presentation on Tuesday, 10/23/12 from 11:45 to 12:45 p.m in E255.

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For Monday, Oct. 22nd: Read the first chapter of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States–up to where Zinn writes, “The reader may as well know that before going on,” a little more than halfway through the chapter.

Howard Zinn: A People’s History Of The United States

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For Wed. Oct. 17th:

Read Overview of Rhetorical Analysis (selections from the wikibook Rhetoric and Composition); also please look at this copy of Dr. King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”–Rhetorical Analysis– (opens in Word)

This is the color-coded copy of Dr. King’s letter, highlighting his rhetorical appeals to his audience’s senses of logic (logos), ethics (ethos), and compassion (pathos). Website: http://faculty.millikin.edu/~moconner/writing/king1a.html

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For Monday, Oct. 15th:

Read:  First, the Clergymen’s letter, and then Dr. King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”–the links are posted below.

Write: Using quotation or paraphrase, write about one highlight in “the Clergymen say/King says” mode. (1/2 page max)

Clergy Letter to King

Letter from Birmingham Jail, Martin Luther King, Jr., 1963

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For Wednesday, Oct. 10:
Please read Dwight Eisenhower’s “Farewell Address”, highlighted in the film Why We Fight. The instructor’s suggestion is that you read fluidly–maybe while listening to the audio–and try not to worry too much about unfamiliar terms, beyond marking them (circles, underlining/highlighting) or writing a list of them in a notebook for future reference. Please write down genuine questions as part of your annotation work.
We will be watching Why We Fight in class. (Feel free to bring quiet snacks.)
Here’s a link to the film online: Why We Fight (dir. Eugene Jarecki)
And write: What is/was Eisenhower saying? (They Say) —And then (I Say) what do you think about his address? (1/2-page min., 1 page max.)
Also: Please give some thought to which Election 2012 office(s) or proposition(s) you might like to read about and report on. We will be dividing up this work during the film in class on the 10th.
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For Monday, Oct. 8th:
Read/Watch: Please see assignments for Wed. Oct. 3–this will be a second chance to get credit for significant annotation of the texts. (Print copies of the Declaration and FAQs can be annotated ‘physically’ on the page, or annotations can be written in your notebook; the two video links can be annotated by writing notes in your notebook. Don’t overdo it–but don’t under-do it, either!)
Read: Chapter 4 of They Say/I Say. (The instructor forgot to post this reading assignment for Oct. 1st. My apologies to the 9am class. –CW)
Write: Please also use templates from They Say/I Say Chapter 4 to write THREE response statements to any of the four texts.
Be sure to identify which text you are responding to–the Declaration, the OWS FAQ, The Young Turks, or Dylan Ratigan–but don’t worry about naming the text completely or citing it formally. For example, you might say something like this:
I agree with the Young Turks that major media coverage of the Nov. 2, 2011 Port of Oakland shutdown was grossly inaccurate, because my experience being part of the shutdown and watching broadcast news reports on that day confirms that the number of participants was far greater than reporters said.  (This sentence uses the first “Template for Agreeing” on p. 57 of TS/IS, 1st ed.)
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For Wednesday, Oct. 3: Please read AND ANNOTATE the following publications, and if you have time and access, view and annotate the two video clips. (These links and more can be found on the “Understanding Occupy and the Election” page, under the “Media Links” page.) Please come to class with some questions about these pieces of information:

Declaration of the Occupation of New York City–mainly a list of grievances. (The link has been repaired!)

Occupy Wall Street: FAQ (frequently asked questions, answered by The Nation magazine’s Nathan Schneider)
Video: Media analysis: The Young Turks tell it like it wasn’t reported:  30-50-100,000 people marched to blockade the Port of Oakland on Nov. 2, 2011 —although many outlets in the MSM reported 4,500 down to 3,000.

Video: Dylan Ratigan’s “rant” that began his Get Money Out / United Republic campaign for a Constitutional amendment to get money out of politics–gets really good about one-third of the way through:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gIcqb9hHQ3E

Bonus feature: FYI: the website for the “Get Money Out” campaign: http://www.getmoneyout.com/
Bonus feature: A profile of campaign financier Sheldon Adelson: http://unitedrepublic.org/2012/the-king-of-money-in-politics/

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For Monday, Oct. 1:

Please be sure you have caught up with any missed reading assignments, and if your Essay One has already been returned, please bring it to class Monday. Our class meeting will involve some sentence-level instruction, and we will read-write-discuss “A More Perfect Union” and “Occupy Shadows Politics”.

* If you attended Cynthia McKinney’s talk on the 26th, you can earn a bonus credit by writing a half-page (max!) response. Please don’t spend more than one sentence summarizing; just get right to what you found interesting about what she shared with us.

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For Wednesday, Sept.26th:

1. Please read “Occupy Shadows Politics” by Seth Weinberg, and

2. Please annotate any “they say/I say” moves you read in either the Weinberg op-ed or one of Dave Zirin’s Edge of Sports columns (link below). You can highlight these on a print copy, or copy the text into a Word document, or hand-write it on a separate sheet of paper.

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In class on the 24th:

Please open the following links in additional tabs:

http://www.laneytower.com/opinion/occupy-shadows-politics-1.2909031#.UGCJ-aCDmSo

Dave Zirin’s The Edge of Sports

http://www.edgeofsports.com/archive.html

Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States

http://www.historyisaweapon.org/zinnapeopleshistory.html

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For Monday, Sept. 24th: Please read Chapter One of They Say/I Say, and be prepared for a short quiz on the way templates can be used to say what others say. *The quiz will be given during the first ten minutes of class.

We will spend part of this class period in one of the computer labs; but please meet on-time at our regular classroom.

* Bonus credit available: Use annotation on a print copy of an opinion/editorial article to highlight places where the writer uses ‘moves’ like those explained in Chapter One. Print copies of the articles with ‘physical’ annotation would work best.

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For Wednesday, Sept. 19th: Monday’s readings delayed/continued:  One extra HW credit is available for substantial annotation of TS/IS and/or B. Obama’s speech–printing the speech would be most economical.

For Monday, Sept. 17th: Two Readings:

Please read the introduction to They Say/I Say, linked here:

http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic862425.files/They%20Say%20I%20Say.pdf

The book is also on reserve at the TEXTBOOKS desk in the Laney Library. Any edition of the book will work.

Please also read “A More Perfect Union” by then-Senator Barack Obama

–but don’t worry about “writing an essay in response” or answering the questions at the end of the essay. Just read and annotate.

–You may have to save the document temporarily, and then open it from where you saved it.

–As you read, look for places where Obama makes the moves described in the They Say/I Say introduction. Also, of course, read for Obama’s main idea and supporting ideas, as well as making note of any questions you have about the argument he is making.

If possible, print the Obama document, and bring it to class.

As with all of our reading, annotation is strongly recommended!

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For Wed, Sept. 12th:

Essay One: “News Media and Me” is due.

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For Mon, Sept. 10th:

Need to print? Use email and/or a USB gadget and print for free at F-170. You’ll need a valid Peralta ID.

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For Wed, Sept. 5th:

After looking at some of the Media Links–the link is on the left under the English 201pages–please write a brief critique of two or three of them. Do they live up to the SPJ standards of professional journalism? Do they seem meaningful to you? Would you recommend them to a friend or family member? You can keep this writing in a notebook–the instructor will check them during class. We will be sharing our critiques and recommendations in groups. (*Noon class: If you have a print copy of an article that the instructor forgot to collect, please bring it to class on Wednesday!)

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*Reminder: Monday Sept. 3rd is a holiday–Labor Day–no classes at Peralta*

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For Wed, Aug. 29:

http://www.fair.org/index.php?page=101

The Society for Professional Journalsim code of standards and ethics:  the rules reporters and news agencies are supposed to follow in order to maintain the public trust:

http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp

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MORE MEDIA & JOURNALISM RESOURCES–CHECK ‘EM OUT!!!

http://www.journalism.org/

http://www.factcheck.org/

http://mediamatters.org/

Still hungry? Here are some commentary “Op-Eds” posted at CommonDreams.org

Readers’ Choice / Most Read Views…

  1. Chris Hedges: The War in the Shadows
  2. Robert Reich: Mitt’s 13% Tax
  3. Bill Bigelow: Howard Zinn at 90 — Lessons from the People’s Historian
  4. Peter Rothberg: The Five Most Under-Reported Stories of the Summer
  5. Dave Zirin: Australian Government Will Issue Overdue Apology to 1968 Olympic Hero Peter Norman
  6. Paul Krugman: Paul Ryan: Galt, Gold and God
  7. Ira Chernus: Why Are Americans So Confused?
  8. Tom Engelhardt: You Were Right When You Waved That “No Blood for Oil” Sign. Iraq Was About Oil
  9. Glenn Greenwald: The Bizarre, Unhealthy, Blinding Media Contempt for Julian Assange
  10. Robert Fisk: Syria’s ‘Rebel Army? They’re a Gang of Foreigners’

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Questions? Email the instructor:

 

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EXTRA-CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES

Attend one of the events offered as an extra-credit opportunity, and write a one-page review of the experience to earn a credit equal to a homework/quiz credit.  Your review may be handwritten or typed–if typed, please double-space.  The review should be submitted in print to the instructor within one week of the day of the event.

1. FREE LIVE THEATER! For the Greater Good, or The Last Election

http://www.sfmt.org/index.php

Nicholl Park–Richmond
Thu, Aug 30th @ 7:00 PM (Music 6:30)
Macdonald Avenue & 31st Street, Richmond

Dolores Park–SF
Sat, Sep 1st @ 2:00 PM (Music 1:30)
Sun, Sep 2nd @ 2:00 PM (Music 1:30)
Mon, Sep 3rd @ 2:00 PM (Music 1:30)
18th St. & Dolores St., San Francisco

 

2. Film: HEIST: Who Stole the American Dream?

http://www.heist-themovie.com/index.html

Screenings:

Brava Theater
San Francisco, CA
Thursday, September 27, 7pm
Presented by the San Francisco Labor Council
Q&A with HEIST co-director and co-producer Don Goldmacher.

La Pena Cultural Center
Berkeley, CA
Sunday, September 30th, 7pm
Q&A with HEIST co-director and co-producer Don Goldmacher.

2012 Presidential and Vice Presidential Debates

 

All debates will take place from 9:00-10:30 p.m. Eastern Time.

First presidential debate:
Wednesday, October 3
University of Denver, Denver, CO
Moderator: Jim Lehrer, Executive Editor of the PBS NewsHour
Vice presidential debate:
Thursday, October 11
Centre College, Danville, KY
Moderator: Martha Raddatz, Senior Foreign Affairs Correspondent, ABC News
Second presidential debate (town meeting format):
Tuesday, October 16
Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
Moderator: Candy Crowley, Chief Political Correspondent, CNN and Anchor, CNN’s State of the Union
Third presidential debate:
Monday, October22
Lynn University, Boca Raton, FL
Moderator:  Bob Schieffer, Chief Washington Correspondent, CBS News and Moderator, Face the Nation

Student Scholarships available now!

www.peraltafoundation.org immediately and apply now.

Deadline is October 1, 2013.

Jessica Keahey

Executive Assistant

Peralta Colleges Foundation

(510) 466-7206

jkeahey@peralta.edu

cid:image001.jpg@01CE9CCE.CE1016C0

333 East 8th Street

Oakland, CA  94606

510.466.7206

www.peraltafoundation.org

Strengthening Education in our Community

http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp